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Proceedings Paper

Synthetic spectra for the Arizona Airglow Experiment
Author(s): Jeffrey E. Johnston; D. B. Hatfield; A. Lyle Broadfoot
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Paper Abstract

The Arizona Airglow Experiment (GLO) is a panchromatic intensified CCD (ICCD) spectrograph, bore sighted with 12 monochromatic imagers. The spectrograph provides continuous spectral coverage from 1150 angstrom to 11,000 angstrom with a resolution of 5 angstrom to 20 angstrom. The spectrograph was designed to record simultaneously as much information as possible from a single column of gas. The resolution was selected to allow the determination of molecular emission vibrational and rotational structure. Molecular band emissions contain much more information than atomic lines, although interpretation of band emissions is more complicated. This complexity is due to the distribution of their energies over broad spectral ranges that overlap. The most productive method of interpreting molecular spectra is by modeling. The nature of the molecular transitions is well known, and synthetic spectra can be calculated to match the recorded spectrum accurately. Our knowledge of the transition probabilities allows accurate estimates of the intensity and shape of blended bands. It is our goal to synthesize all of the emissions recorded by the GLO as a tool to aid in detailed analysis of spectra. This work describes the approach used in calculating the synthetic spectra and references the source of parameters used for 14 band systems. This software utility will become a part of the GLO facility.

Paper Details

Date Published: 30 September 1994
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 2266, Optical Spectroscopic Techniques and Instrumentation for Atmospheric and Space Research, (30 September 1994); doi: 10.1117/12.187559
Show Author Affiliations
Jeffrey E. Johnston, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
D. B. Hatfield, Univ. of Arizona (United States)
A. Lyle Broadfoot, Univ. of Arizona (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2266:
Optical Spectroscopic Techniques and Instrumentation for Atmospheric and Space Research
Jinxue Wang; Paul B. Hays, Editor(s)

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