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Proceedings Paper

Machine models and registration
Author(s): Terrence E. Zavecz
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Paper Abstract

Equipment for pattern generation in the semiconductor industry have long been a critical part of the manufacturing process. As the industry matured and finer features were required on larger exposure fields, the complexity of these machines grew. The requirements of calibration soon taxed the ability of statistics to understand the complexities of and control required by the tools. In response, the industry adopted an analytical method of data analysis. Mathematical models describing the operation, design and behavior of these tools were developed. These models are called machine models and herein is contained a critical review of the technology to date. The development of machine models is shownfrom a historical standpoint. First the concepts of metrology and a clear explanation of the analytical method are presented. Then the development of modeling and how it was influenced by the automation of metrology in the mid 1980’s. The later sections describe models and their application to machine characterization and matching. These are followed by recent concepts in model building and evaluation. In doing so, it is shown how the concept of machine models are critical to the continued advancement of lithography and equipment development. A final section presents some previously unpublished work on the determination of machine precision. The work is supported by an appendix of derivations for the basic model elements.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 July 1994
PDF: 26 pages
Proc. SPIE 10274, Handbook of Critical Dimension Metrology and Process Control: A Critical Review, 102740B (1 July 1994); doi: 10.1117/12.187453
Show Author Affiliations
Terrence E. Zavecz, TEA Systems Corp. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10274:
Handbook of Critical Dimension Metrology and Process Control: A Critical Review
Kevin M. Monahan, Editor(s)

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