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Proceedings Paper

Effects of plasma-etching-induced gate oxide degradation on MOSFET's 1/f noise
Author(s): Chun Hu; Scott T. Martin; Eugene Worley; Joe White; Ray Kjar; Guann-pyng Li
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Paper Abstract

Plasma etching degrades the gate oxide in scaled down MOS transistors and therefore affects the device low frequency noise behavior. The effects of plasma etching induced gate oxide damage on MOSFETs 1/f noise have been studied on devices fabricated with different field plate perimeter to gate area ratio antennas on various metal levels. The correlation between plasma etching induced gate oxide damage and device 1/f noise has been observed. The plasma etching introduces oxide trap centers near Si/SiO2 interface, which give rise to an abnormal shoulder in device 1/f noise spectrum. This is confirmed by reproducing the abnormal noise spectrum on device which initially received less damage during plasma processing by means of performing Fowler-Nordheim stress and forming gas annealing. The correlation between hot-carrier injection degradation and device abnormal 1/f noise was also observed, implying that plasma etching causes abnormal 1/f noise. The physical properties of the traps were studied by the gate bias and temperature dependence of the device 1/f noise.

Paper Details

Date Published: 14 September 1994
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 2334, Microelectronics Manufacturability, Yield, and Reliability, (14 September 1994); doi: 10.1117/12.186741
Show Author Affiliations
Chun Hu, Univ. of California/Irvine (United States)
Scott T. Martin, Univ. of California/Irvine (United States)
Eugene Worley, Rockwell International Corp. (United States)
Joe White, Rockwell International Corp. (United States)
Ray Kjar, Rockwell International Corp. (United States)
Guann-pyng Li, Univ. of California/Irvine (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2334:
Microelectronics Manufacturability, Yield, and Reliability
Barbara Vasquez; Hisao Kawasaki, Editor(s)

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