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Proceedings Paper

Ultraviolet/visible polarimetric signatures for discrimination
Author(s): Stephen L. Hammonds; Dimitris Lianos
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Paper Abstract

The feasibility of polarization technology to solve some of the stressing problems faced by BMDO has been demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. Aim point selection and the ability to discriminate targets from decoys, debris, etc. have been identified as the most stressing requirements for current BMDO interceptors. Simulations predict and field tests confirm that polarization technology has the potential to satisfy these requirements. Studies indicate that polarization signatures are more sensitive to target shape and dynamics than radiometric data. Polarized self emission signatures were found to provide the precise orientation of an object in precessional motion. The additional information gained from polarization may enhance an interceptor's capability to distinguish a target from decoys. Methods for the detection of linearly polarized UV radiation from missiles is briefly summarized. A novel optical system which simultaneously measures linear polarization Stokes vector elements on a single focal place is introduced. Preliminary measurements of polarized light from UV lamp reflections and from model rocket motor tests have been made with this system.

Paper Details

Date Published: 14 September 1994
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 2265, Polarization Analysis and Measurement II, (14 September 1994); doi: 10.1117/12.186697
Show Author Affiliations
Stephen L. Hammonds, U.S. Army Space and Strategic Defense Command (United States)
Dimitris Lianos, U.S. Army Space and Strategic Defense Command (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2265:
Polarization Analysis and Measurement II
Dennis H. Goldstein; David B. Chenault, Editor(s)

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