Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Pigmented foils for radiative cooling and condensation irrigation
Author(s): Torbjorn M.J. Nilsson; William E. Vargas; Gunnar A. Niklasson
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

This paper reports on the development of pigmented polyethylene foils for radiative cooling. The optical properties of the foils were optimized for applications in day-time radiative cooling and water condensation. We first study highly scattering foils used as convection shields. These cover foils combine a high solar reflectance and a high transmittance in the atmospheric window region in the infrared. Different pigment materials were studied and ZnS was the only one that could prevent heating of an underlying blackbody at noon, with the sun in its zenith. A 400 micrometers thick ZnS pigmented polyethylene foil with a pigment volume fraction of 0.15 was tested in Tanzania. At noon the observed temperature of the covered blackbody was only 1.5 K above the ambient. Secondly, we study the potential for condensation of water in an arid region. Pigmented foils for this purpose should combine a high solar reflectance and a high infrared emittance, in order to promote condensation by the radiative cooling effect. Titanium dioxide is a fairly good infrared emitter, but the emittance can be improved by using a mixture of TiO2 and BaSO4 pigments or only employing a composite SiO2/TiO2. Field tests with a 390 micrometers thick polyethylene foil with TiO2 and BaSO4 pigments gave encouraging results.

Paper Details

Date Published: 9 September 1994
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 2255, Optical Materials Technology for Energy Efficiency and Solar Energy Conversion XIII, (9 September 1994); doi: 10.1117/12.185370
Show Author Affiliations
Torbjorn M.J. Nilsson, Chalmers Univ. of Technology (Sweden)
William E. Vargas, Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)
Gunnar A. Niklasson, Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2255:
Optical Materials Technology for Energy Efficiency and Solar Energy Conversion XIII

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top