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Proceedings Paper

Magnetic microscopy using SQUIDs
Author(s): Frederick C. Wellstood; R. C. Black; Anna Mathai; Y. Gim; D. Song; A. Amar; Eugene Dantsker; Andrew H. Miklich; David T. Nemeth; J. J. Kingston; Dieter Koelle; Frank Ludwig; John Clarke
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Paper Abstract

We have developed scanning probe magnetic microscopes which use dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) to obtain images of the magnetic field above a sample surface. In our instruments, the SQUID is held fixed and the sample is scanned in a raster pattern by means of a computer-controlled cryogenic positioning mechanism. We record the output of the SQUID as a function of sample position and use this to construct gray-scale or false color images of the magnetic field above the sample. We presently have two microscopes which can scan in 3D; one microscope uses a high transition temperature ((Tau) c) YBa2Cu3O7 SQUID while the other microscope uses a low-(Tau) c Nb-PbIn SQUID. Our high-(Tau) c microscope operates with the sample and SQUID in liquid nitrogen and typically achieves a spatial resolution of about 20-80 micrometers and a magnetic field resolution of about 20-200 pT for a 1 second average. Our low-(Tau) c microsope operates with the sample and SQUID in a liquid-helium cooled vacuum space and is designed to allow the imaging of samples at different temperatures. We report on the microscopic magnetic imaging of currents, ferromagnetic inks, superconducting films and normal metal samples.

Paper Details

Date Published: 2 July 1994
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 2160, Superconductive Devices and Circuits, (2 July 1994); doi: 10.1117/12.180995
Show Author Affiliations
Frederick C. Wellstood, Univ. of Maryland/College Park (United States)
R. C. Black, Univ. of Maryland/College Park (United States)
Anna Mathai, Univ. of Maryland/College Park (United States)
Y. Gim, Univ. of Maryland/College Park (United States)
D. Song, Univ. of Maryland/College Park (United States)
A. Amar, Univ. of Maryland/College Park (United States)
Eugene Dantsker, Univ. of California/Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley Lab. (United States)
Andrew H. Miklich, Univ. of California/Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley Lab. (United States)
David T. Nemeth, Univ. of California/Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley Lab. (United States)
J. J. Kingston, Univ. of California/Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley Lab. (United States)
Dieter Koelle, Univ. of California/Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley Lab. (United States)
Frank Ludwig, Univ. of California/Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley Lab. (United States)
John Clarke, Univ. of California/Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2160:
Superconductive Devices and Circuits
Robert A. Buhrman; John T. Clarke; Ken Daly; Roger H. Koch; Jerome A. Luine; Randy W. Simon, Editor(s)

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