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Proceedings Paper

Production of low-cost large-area CdZnTe films by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on GaAs and Si substrates
Author(s): Nasser H. Karam; F. T. J. Smith; Rengarajan Sudharsanan; A. Mastrovito; James T. Daly; Michael M. Sanfacon; M. Leonard; N. A. El-Masry
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Paper Abstract

This paper reports the deposition of (100) GaAs and (111)B CdZnTe layers on silicon substrates up to 4-inch diameter to produce substrates suitable for liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) of high-quality HgCdTe layers. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition is used for both GaAs and CdZnTe in a reactor capable of deposition onto eighteen 3-inch or ten 4-inch wafers per run. An encapsulation scheme is described that prevents contamination of a Te melt by Si or GaAs during LPE growth. Excellent uniformity of thickness and Zn concentration are achieved in the MOCVD films. The CdZnTe films show only lamellar twins close to the GaAs interface; no twins capable of propagating into the HgCdTe layer are formed. These substrates have been used for the growth of pure HgCdTe films having a dislocation density that is only a factor of 2 to 4 higher than that measured in similar films grown on bulk CdTe substrates.

Paper Details

Date Published: 13 July 1994
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 2228, Producibility of II-VI Materials and Devices, (13 July 1994); doi: 10.1117/12.179651
Show Author Affiliations
Nasser H. Karam, Spire Corp. (United States)
F. T. J. Smith, LORAL Infrared and Imaging Systems, Inc. (United States)
Rengarajan Sudharsanan, Spire Corp. (United States)
A. Mastrovito, Spire Corp. (United States)
James T. Daly, Spire Corp. (United States)
Michael M. Sanfacon, Spire Corp. (United States)
M. Leonard, North Carolina State Univ. (United States)
N. A. El-Masry, North Carolina State Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2228:
Producibility of II-VI Materials and Devices
Herbert K. Pollehn; Raymond S. Balcerak, Editor(s)

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