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Proceedings Paper

Fiber sensors for control and health monitoring system for mining machinery
Author(s): Richard O. Claus; Michael F. Gunther; Jonathan A. Greene; Tuan A. Tran; Kent A. Murphy
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Paper Abstract

This paper describes initial results of a fiber optic-based sensor during on-site testing performed by FEORC and Fiber and Sensor Technologies at Ingersol-Rand. Advantages of the fiber optic sensor are a demonstrated enhanced survivability, higher sensitivity, smaller size, electromagnetic interference immunity, and reduced risk of explosion. The conventional wire strain gages typically survive only a few minutes attached to the drill steel and drive chain, while the fiber sensors described here have survived over 400 hours and are currently still functioning properly. The tests described include the demonstration of strain energy measurements on the drive chain and drill steel, and displacement measurements of the piston within the drifter. All of the sensors tested can be used as both a laboratory evaluation and testing tools, as well as being an integral part of a proposed control and health monitoring system.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 May 1994
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 2191, Smart Structures and Materials 1994: Smart Sensing, Processing, and Instrumentation, (1 May 1994); doi: 10.1117/12.173972
Show Author Affiliations
Richard O. Claus, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ. (United States)
Michael F. Gunther, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ. (United States)
Jonathan A. Greene, Fiber and Sensor Technologies, Inc. (United States)
Tuan A. Tran, Fiber and Sensor Technologies, Inc. (United States)
Kent A. Murphy, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2191:
Smart Structures and Materials 1994: Smart Sensing, Processing, and Instrumentation
James S. Sirkis, Editor(s)

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