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Proceedings Paper

Development and clinical evaluation of noninvasive near-infrared monitoring of cerebral oxygenation
Author(s): Yappa A.B.D. Wickramasinghe; Peter J. Rolfe; Keith Palmer; S. Watkins; S. A. Spencer; M. Doyle; S. O'Brien; A. Walker; C. Rice; C. Smallpeice
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Paper Abstract

Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a relatively new method which is suitable for monitoring oxygenation in blood and tissue in the brain of the fetus and the neonate. The technique involves in-vivo determination of the absorption of light in the wavelength range 775 to 900 nm through such tissue and converting such changes in absorbance to provide information about the changes in the concentration of oxygenated and de-oxygenated haemoglobin (HbO2 and Hb). Recent developments of the methodology now enable the calculation of changes in cerebral blood volume (CBV) as well as absolute CBV and cerebral blood flow (CBF). The attraction of this method is its applicability to monitor cerebral function in a wide variety of patient groups. Although primarily developed for neonatal use it is today applied on the fetus to investigate fetal hypoxia and on adults undergoing surgery.

Paper Details

Date Published: 15 February 1994
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 2085, Biochemical and Medical Sensors, (15 February 1994); doi: 10.1117/12.168758
Show Author Affiliations
Yappa A.B.D. Wickramasinghe, North Staffordshire Hospital (United Kingdom)
Peter J. Rolfe, North Staffordshire Hospital (United Kingdom)
Keith Palmer, North Staffordshire Hospital (United Kingdom)
S. Watkins, North Staffordshire Hospital (United Kingdom)
S. A. Spencer, North Staffordshire Hospital (United Kingdom)
M. Doyle, North Staffordshire Hospital (United Kingdom)
S. O'Brien, North Staffordshire Hospital (United Kingdom)
A. Walker, North Staffordshire Hospital (United Kingdom)
C. Rice, North Staffordshire Hospital (United Kingdom)
C. Smallpeice, North Staffordshire Hospital (United Kingdom)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2085:
Biochemical and Medical Sensors
Otto S. Wolfbeis, Editor(s)

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