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Proceedings Paper

Three-dimensional quantification with laser scanning confocal microscopy
Author(s): Takahiro Ode; Satoshi Komiya
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Paper Abstract

A confocal microscope system illuminates the specimen with a point light source and then collects the reflected light onto a point detector. Only when the specimen is exactly in focus will any significant amount of light fall onto the detector. This gives the height sectioning capability of the microscope. Obtaining 0.1 micron depth resolution is not difficult. A potential drawback of the confocal microscope is that only the in focus region of the specimen is visible. We can use this property to form both an extended focus image and a three dimensional topological map. This extended focus mode is useful for understanding three dimensional structures. By using a three dimensional topological map image, where each pixel has an accurate calibration in three dimension, one can calculate various parameters such as surface roughness, height, depth, and volume. The volume of a three dimensional structure can be defined as the integral of the individual pixel values lying under the reference plane. One can define this reference plane manually with a mouse and a screen cursor. The software finds the volume below the surface enclosed within that area, deriving the height of the surrounding, reference surface.

Paper Details

Date Published: 29 December 1993
PDF: 5 pages
Proc. SPIE 1987, Recording Systems: High-Resolution Cameras and Recording Devices and Laser Scanning and Recording Systems, (29 December 1993); doi: 10.1117/12.165183
Show Author Affiliations
Takahiro Ode, Lasertec Corp. (Japan)
Satoshi Komiya, Lasertec Corp. (United Kingdom)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1987:
Recording Systems: High-Resolution Cameras and Recording Devices and Laser Scanning and Recording Systems
Leo Beiser; Reimar K. Lenz, Editor(s)

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