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Proceedings Paper

Hypersonic engine component experiments in a high heat flux supersonic flow environment
Author(s): Herbert Joe Gladden; Matthew E. Melis
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Paper Abstract

The major concern in advancing the state-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic vehicles is the development of an aeropropulsion system capable of withstanding the sustained high thermal loads expected during hypersonic flight. Even though progress has been made in the computational understanding of fluid dynamics and the physics/chemistry of high speed flight, there is also a need for experimental facilities capable of providing a high heat flux environment for testing component concepts and verifying/calibrating these analyses. A hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine heat source has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center that is capable of providing heat fluxes up to 450 W/cm2 on flat surfaces and up to 5,000 W/cm2 at the leading edge stagnation point of a strut in a supersonic flow stream. Gas temperatures up to 3050 K can also be attained. Two recent experimental programs conducted in this facility are discussed.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 November 1993
PDF: 14 pages
Proc. SPIE 1997, High Heat Flux Engineering II, (12 November 1993); doi: 10.1117/12.163822
Show Author Affiliations
Herbert Joe Gladden, NASA Lewis Research Ctr. (United States)
Matthew E. Melis, NASA Lewis Research Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1997:
High Heat Flux Engineering II
Ali M. Khounsary, Editor(s)

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