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Proceedings Paper

Imaging interferometer for terrestrial remote sensing
Author(s): Philip D. Hammer; Francisco P.J. Valero; David L. Peterson; William Hayden Smith
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Paper Abstract

A prototype imaging interferometer called DASI (digital array scanned interferometer) is under development at our laboratories. Our objective is to design an instrument for remote sensing of Earth's atmosphere and surface. This paper describes the unusual characteristics of DASIs which make them promising candidates for ground and aircraft-based terrestrial measurements. These characteristics include superior signal-to-noise, design simplicity and compactness, relative to dispersion based imaging spectrometers. Perhaps one of the most notable features of DASIs is their ability to acquire an entire interferogram simultaneously without any moving optical elements. We also describe selected laboratory and ground based field measurements using the prototype DASI. A CCD detector array was placed at the DASI detector plane for wavelength coverage from 0.4 to 1.0 micrometers . A NICMOS MCT detector was used for coverage from 1.1 to 2.2 micrometers . The DASI was configured to have a spectral resolution of about 300 cm-1, a spatial field of view of 5 degrees, and a constant number of transverse spatial elements (detector dependent) for each exposure frame. Frame exposure rates were up to 0.6 Hz with the potential to achieve 5 Hz. Image cube measurements of laboratory targets and terrestrial scenes were obtained by multiple frame scanning over the field of view. These data sets reveal the potential science yields from obtaining simultaneous high resolution spatial and spectral information.

Paper Details

Date Published: 23 September 1993
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 1937, Imaging Spectrometry of the Terrestrial Environment, (23 September 1993); doi: 10.1117/12.157061
Show Author Affiliations
Philip D. Hammer, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)
Francisco P.J. Valero, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)
David L. Peterson, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)
William Hayden Smith, Washington Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1937:
Imaging Spectrometry of the Terrestrial Environment
Gregg Vane, Editor(s)

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