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Proceedings Paper

Fiber optic measurement of high hydrostatic pressure with cholesteric liquid crystals
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Paper Abstract

The paper presents the fiber-optic method for measurement of high hydrostatic pressure applied to a sensing element comprising a cholesteric liquid crystal (ChLC) being connected to multimode optical fibers for communication with a light source and a device for measurement of light intensity. The method exploiting the effect of pressure-induced changes in the wavelength of maximum light reflection observed in ChLCs resides in guiding a light beam of predetermined wavelength generated by the light source toward a layer of the ChLC using one of the multimode optical fibers. The light beam reflected by the layer is collected using another of the multimode optical fibers being connected to the device for measurement of light intensity. This method is particularly well adapted for measuring pressure up to 100 MPa with a good linear response and sensitivity for specific ranges of pressure useful in industrial applications. The results obtained indicate that a fiber-optic sensing device based on this method has pressure coefficient two orders of magnitude higher than current high-pressure sensors. The paper also discusses possible approaches towards the temperature desensitization procedure of the fiber-optic method of pressure measurement.

Paper Details

Date Published: 15 October 1993
PDF: 5 pages
Proc. SPIE 1845, Liquid and Solid State Crystals: Physics, Technology and Applications, (15 October 1993); doi: 10.1117/12.156994
Show Author Affiliations
Tomasz R. Wolinski, Warsaw Univ. of Technology (Poland)
Wojtek J. Bock, Univ. du Quebec a Hull (Canada)
Roman S. Dabrowski, Military Technical Academy (Poland)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1845:
Liquid and Solid State Crystals: Physics, Technology and Applications

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