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Proceedings Paper

Tissue autofluorescence spectroscopy: an intermediate endpoint for chemopreventive agents
Author(s): Stimson P. Schantz; Howard E. Savage; Peter G. Sacks; Michael Silverberg; Martin Lipkin; Kan Yang; Gui Chen Tang; Robert R. Alfano
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Paper Abstract

We report on the fluorescence spectroscopy of a multicellular tumor spheroid treated and non- treated with (beta) -all-trans retinoic acid. Following ten days of treatment with RA (10-6M), reproducible fluorescent changes were measured using a Mediscience CD scanner. The most significant changes included an increase in emission at 520 nm in the RA treated spheroids when excited at 340 nm. When investigating fluorescence emission at 450 nm, a blue shift in the excitation profile was noted. Molecular alterations induced by RA and as measured by optical fluorescence spectroscopy may arise from qualitative and/or quantitative changes in a number of key molecules involved in cellular differentiation, proliferation and/or electron transfer, i.e. NADH at (450 nm emission), flavins (520 nm), or cytokeratins (520 nm). To further explore alterations of cytokeratins, immunohistochemical staining showed an increase in AE1 positive cells induced by RA which paralleled the increased 520 nm signal. Our results indicate that certain vitamin derivatives are capable of modulating the intrinsic fluorescence profile emitted by neoplastic mucosa. Tissue autofluorescence may represent a significant marker for the biologic effect of cancer preventing agents in clinical trials.

Paper Details

Date Published: 27 August 1993
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 1887, Physiological Imaging, Spectroscopy, and Early-Detection Diagnostic Methods, (27 August 1993); doi: 10.1117/12.151181
Show Author Affiliations
Stimson P. Schantz, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Ctr. (United States)
Howard E. Savage, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Ctr. (United States)
Peter G. Sacks, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Ctr. (United States)
Michael Silverberg, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Ctr. (United States)
Martin Lipkin, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Ctr. (United States)
Kan Yang, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Ctr. (United States)
Gui Chen Tang, CUNY/City College (United States)
Robert R. Alfano, CUNY/City College (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1887:
Physiological Imaging, Spectroscopy, and Early-Detection Diagnostic Methods
Randall Locke Barbour; Mark J. Carvlin, Editor(s)

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