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Proceedings Paper

Functional imaging of the brain by MRI
Author(s): D. LeBihan; Charles-Andre Cuenod; J. Robert Turner; P. Jezzard; Valerie Bonnerot; Thomas A. Zeffiro
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Paper Abstract

Recent developments in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) enabling imaging of hemodynamics and metabolism hold significant promise in the noninvasive evaluation of normal and abnormal brain function. Among several methods, the most successful approach exploits the sensitivity of MRI to changes in the oxygenation status of hemoglobin (oxy/deoxyhemoglobin) in red blood cells related to local variations in blood flow and oxygen consumption in tissues. In cerebral cortex, such variations may be induced by external stimuli or internal cognitive processes. Typically, MRI signal slightly increases when brain is activated due to increase in oxygen supply (blood flow). These studies suggest that MRI may be the method of choice to study mental and cognitive processes underlying the function of the human brain.

Paper Details

Date Published: 27 August 1993
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 1887, Physiological Imaging, Spectroscopy, and Early-Detection Diagnostic Methods, (27 August 1993); doi: 10.1117/12.151173
Show Author Affiliations
D. LeBihan, National Institutes of Health (United States)
Charles-Andre Cuenod, National Institutes of Health (United States)
J. Robert Turner, National Institutes of Health (United States)
P. Jezzard, National Institutes of Health (United States)
Valerie Bonnerot, National Institutes of Health (United States)
Thomas A. Zeffiro, National Institutes of Health (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1887:
Physiological Imaging, Spectroscopy, and Early-Detection Diagnostic Methods
Randall Locke Barbour; Mark J. Carvlin, Editor(s)

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