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Proceedings Paper

What you see is not what you get with EO imaging systems
Author(s): Gerald C. Holst
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Paper Abstract

Sampling is present in all electronic imaging systems. For scanning systems, the scene is sampled in the cross scan direction by the discrete location of the detectors and by the A/D converter in the scan direction. For staring arrays, the discrete location of the detectors samples the scene in both directions. Sampling creates both phasing effects and aliasing. Since the aliasing occurs at the detector, it cannot be avoided. After a signal has been aliased, it cannot be reconstructed. Aliasing and phasing effects are obvious when viewing periodic targets such as those used for system characterization. Aliasing and phasing effects become pronounced as the target frequency approaches the electronic imaging systems's Nyquist frequency. Aliasing is not very obvious when viewing complex scenery and, as such, is rarely reported during actual system usage although it is always present. We have become accustomed to phasing effects and aliasing at the moves, on TV and on computer monitors. These effects becomes bothersome when trying to perform scientific measurements. What you see visually is not what you get with an EO imaging system.

Paper Details

Date Published: 13 August 1993
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 1967, Characterization, Propagation, and Simulation of Sources and Backgrounds III, (13 August 1993); doi: 10.1117/12.151036
Show Author Affiliations
Gerald C. Holst, Martin Marietta Electronics Systems (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1967:
Characterization, Propagation, and Simulation of Sources and Backgrounds III
Wendell R. Watkins; Dieter Clement, Editor(s)

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