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Proceedings Paper

Nd:YAG 1.44 laser ablation of human cartilage
Author(s): Robert S. Cummings; John A. Prodoehl; Anthony L.B. Rhodes; Johnathan David Black; Henry H. Sherk
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Paper Abstract

This study determined the effectiveness of a Neodymium:YAG 1.44 micrometers wavelength laser on human cartilage. This wavelength is strongly absorbed by water. Cadaveric meniscal fibrocartilage and articular hyaline cartilage were harvested and placed in normal saline during the study. A 600 micrometers quartz fiber was applied perpendicularly to the tissues with a force of 0.098 N. Quantitative measurements were then made of the ablation rate as a function of fluence. The laser energy was delivered at a constant repetition rate of 5 Hz., 650 microsecond(s) pulsewidth, and energy levels ranging from 0.5 joules to 2.0 joules. Following the ablation of the tissue, the specimens were fixed in formalin for histologic evaluation. The results of the study indicate that the ablation rate is 0.03 mm/mj/mm2 for hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage. Fibrocartilage was cut at approximately the same rate as hyaline cartilage. There was a threshold fluence projected to be 987 mj/mm2 for hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage. Our results indicate that the pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.44 micrometers has a threshold fluence above which it will ablate human cartilage, and that its ablation rate is directly proportional to fluence over the range of parameters tested. Fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage demonstrated similar threshold fluence and ablation rates which is related to the high water content of these tissues.

Paper Details

Date Published: 21 July 1993
PDF: 3 pages
Proc. SPIE 1880, Lasers in Orthopedic, Dental, and Veterinary Medicine II, (21 July 1993); doi: 10.1117/12.148329
Show Author Affiliations
Robert S. Cummings, Medical College of Pennsylvania (United States)
John A. Prodoehl, Medical College of Pennsylvania (United States)
Anthony L.B. Rhodes, Medical College of Pennsylvania (United States)
Johnathan David Black, Medical College of Pennsylvania (United States)
Henry H. Sherk, Medical College of Pennsylvania (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1880:
Lasers in Orthopedic, Dental, and Veterinary Medicine II
Dov Gal; Stephen J. O'Brien; C. T. Vangsness; Joel M. White; Harvey A. Wigdor, Editor(s)

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