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Proceedings Paper

Heat-free photochemical tissue welding with 1,8-naphthalimide dyes using visible (420 nm) light
Author(s): Millard M. Judy; James Lester Matthews; Richard L. Boriak; A. Burlacu; Dorothy E. Lewis; Ronald E. Utecht
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Paper Abstract

We have newly designed and synthesized a class of photochemical 1,8-naphthalimide dyes. Photochemical investigation strongly suggests that these dyes function as photoalkylation agents following activation to an intermediate state by visible light (circa 420 nm) excitation. The activated species reacts readily with nucleophilic amino acid residues; e.g., tryptophan, tyrosine, cysteine, and methionine. One such dye, 1,14-bis(N-hexyl-3'-bromo- 1,8'-naphthalimid-4'-yl)-1,4,11,14-tetraazatetradecane-5,10-dione, incorporating two reactive 1,8-naphthalimide groups at each end of an intervening structural bridge has been used to achieve photochemical or photoactivated bonding (welding) of collagenous dura mater sheets to each other. Weld shear strengths of up to 425 gm/cm2 (1.14 X 104 Nt/m2) have been obtained.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 July 1993
PDF: 5 pages
Proc. SPIE 1876, Lasers in Otolaryngology, Dermatology, and Tissue Welding, (1 July 1993); doi: 10.1117/12.147028
Show Author Affiliations
Millard M. Judy, Baylor Research Institute (United States)
James Lester Matthews, Baylor Research Institute (United States)
Richard L. Boriak, Baylor Research Institute (United States)
A. Burlacu, Baylor Research Institute (United States)
Dorothy E. Lewis, Baylor College of Medicine (United States)
Ronald E. Utecht, South Dakota State Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1876:
Lasers in Otolaryngology, Dermatology, and Tissue Welding
R. Rox Anderson; Lawrence S. Bass; Stanley M. Shapshay; John V. White; Rodney A. White, Editor(s)

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