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Proceedings Paper

Photodynamic therapy in prostate cancer: optical dosimetry and response of normal tissue
Author(s): Qun Chen; Sugandh D. Shetty; Larry Heads; Frank Bolin; Brian C. Wilson; Michael S. Patterson; Larry T. Sirls; Daniel Schultz; Joseph C. Cerny; Fred W. Hetzel
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Paper Abstract

The present study explores the possibility of utilizing photodynamic therapy (PDT) in treating localized prostate carcinoma. Optical properties of ex vivo human prostatectomy specimens, and in vivo and ex vivo dog prostate glands were studied. The size of the PDT induced lesion in dog prostate was pathologically evaluated as a biological endpoint. The data indicate that the human normal and carcinoma prostate tissues have similar optical properties. The average effective attenuation depth is less in vivo than that of ex vivo. The PDT treatment generated a lesion size of up to 16 mm in diameter. The data suggest that PDT is a promising modality in prostate cancer treatment. Multiple fiber system may be required for clinical treatment.

Paper Details

Date Published: 18 June 1993
PDF: 5 pages
Proc. SPIE 1881, Optical Methods for Tumor Treatment and Detection: Mechanisms and Techniques in Photodynamic Therapy II, (18 June 1993); doi: 10.1117/12.146314
Show Author Affiliations
Qun Chen, Henry Ford Hospital and Oakland Univ. (United States)
Sugandh D. Shetty, Henry Ford Hospital (United States)
Larry Heads, Henry Ford Hospital (United States)
Frank Bolin, Henry Ford Hospital (United States)
Brian C. Wilson, Ontario Cancer Institute (Canada)
Michael S. Patterson, Hamilton Regional Cancer Ctr. (Canada)
Larry T. Sirls, Henry Ford Hospital (United States)
Daniel Schultz, Henry Ford Hospital (United States)
Joseph C. Cerny, Henry Ford Hospital (United States)
Fred W. Hetzel, Henry Ford Hospital and Oakland Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1881:
Optical Methods for Tumor Treatment and Detection: Mechanisms and Techniques in Photodynamic Therapy II
Thomas J. Dougherty, Editor(s)

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