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Proceedings Paper

Light penetration in human skin: in-vivo measurements using isotropic detector
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Paper Abstract

An isotropic probe for direct measurement of fluence rate in tissue was made by melting 110 micrometers -core fiber to less than 0.4 mm sphere and painting by scattering material. Anisotropy response for the best probe of 0.35 mm diameter was +/- 10% in angular range to +/- 150 degree(s). The general position error of the probe in the tissue provided by experimental setup was less than 0.1 mm. The fluence rate was measured in the human leg in vivo at a depth of up to 5 mm for incident irradiance of 100 mW/cm2 and wavelength 625 nm (dye laser) for beam diameters of 1 mm and 5 mm. Effective attenuation coefficients of about 0.6 mm-1 (for depth of up to 1 mm) and 0.7 mm-1 (for muscle layers) were obtained. Differences in light distribution in the skin comparative to the deeper layers were not found.

Paper Details

Date Published: 18 June 1993
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 1881, Optical Methods for Tumor Treatment and Detection: Mechanisms and Techniques in Photodynamic Therapy II, (18 June 1993); doi: 10.1117/12.146313
Show Author Affiliations
Ivan S. Melnik, Univ. Ulm (Canada)
Rudolf W. Steiner, Univ. Ulm (Germany)
Alwin Kienle, Univ. Ulm (Germany)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1881:
Optical Methods for Tumor Treatment and Detection: Mechanisms and Techniques in Photodynamic Therapy II
Thomas J. Dougherty, Editor(s)

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