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Proceedings Paper

Electromigration and current-carrying implications for aluminum-based metallurgy with tungsten stud via interconnections
Author(s): Hazara Singit Rathore; R. G. Filippi; R. A. Wachnik; Jose J. Estabil; Thomas Kwok
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Paper Abstract

The electromigration behavior of Ti-AlCu-Ti metallurgy is presented in this work. For single- level structures in the absence of tungsten (W) stud interconnections, a greater-than-100X lifetime improvement over AlCu is measured. The metal linewidth strongly affects the median time to failure, T50, and standard deviation, sigma ((sigma) ), of the lognormal distribution. For two-level W stud chains, a 50X degradation in lifetime as compared to single-level structures is measured. The lifetime of these W stud chains depends on the Ti- AlCu-Ti current density rather than the stud current density. The 'reservoir effect', in which the electromigration lifetime of Ti-AlCu-Ti stripes depends strongly on W studs near the electron source end of the stripes, is a direct result of W acting as a diffusion barrier. The lifetime of W stud chains with Ti-AlCu-Ti metallurgy is longer for 2.0% copper than for 0.5% copper.

Paper Details

Date Published: 21 May 1993
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 1805, Submicrometer Metallization: Challenges, Opportunities, and Limitations, (21 May 1993); doi: 10.1117/12.145481
Show Author Affiliations
Hazara Singit Rathore, IBM East Fishkill (United States)
R. G. Filippi, IBM East Fishkill (United States)
R. A. Wachnik, IBM East Fishkill (United States)
Jose J. Estabil, Therma-Wave Inc. (United States)
Thomas Kwok, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1805:
Submicrometer Metallization: Challenges, Opportunities, and Limitations
Thomas Kwok; Takamaro Kikkawa; Krishna Shenai, Editor(s)

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