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Proceedings Paper

Micromachined fiber optic sensors
Author(s): Brian Culshaw
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Paper Abstract

Micromachined sensors, especially those based upon silicon technology are compatible with simple batch processing and so, in principle, may be fabricated repeatably and economically. For relatively precise (=0.1% and better) measurements, microresonators in which the measurand is caused to modulate the resonant frequency of a mechanical structure can be particularly attractive. Micromechanics enables these resonators to be readily fabricated to the appropriate sub-millimetre dimensions which are compatible with all optical excitation and detection of the resonance phenomena. The ability to transmit the necessary optical signals along fibres results in a precise miniature and potentially rugged transducer system. These fibre optic resonator devices which are entirely electronically passive are particularly suited to applications involving environments subject to high electro-magnetic fields and/or to extremes of temperature.

This paper introduces the concepts underpinning the realisation of micromachined resonator fibre optic sensors, discusses the achievements in prototype sensor systems realised to date and projects the future requirements which must be fulfilled before the technology can realise its full commercial potential. Measurements to 0.1% accuracy over very wide temperature ranges have been demonstrated to be feasible and applications in the difficult environments typified by aerospace, industrial, and automotive measurements and in chemical/biochemical systems are emerging.

Paper Details

Date Published: 28 January 1993
PDF: 25 pages
Proc. SPIE 10266, Fiber Optic Sensors: A Critical Review, 1026606 (28 January 1993); doi: 10.1117/12.145200
Show Author Affiliations
Brian Culshaw, Univ. of Strathclyde (United Kingdom)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10266:
Fiber Optic Sensors: A Critical Review
Eric Udd, Editor(s)

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