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Proceedings Paper

Integrated optic biosensor
Author(s): Anthony A. Boiarski; James R. Busch; Ballwant S. Bhullar; Richard W. Ridgway; Larry S. Miller; A. W. Zulich
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Paper Abstract

A micro-sized biosensor is formed using integrated-optic channel waveguides in a Mach- Zehnder interferometer configuration. The device measures refractive index changes on the waveguide surface, so it is called a biorefractometer. With an appropriate overlay or selective coating, the sensor can monitor proteins in blood or pollutants and bio-warfare agents in water. The waveguides are fabricated in a glass substrate using potassium ion exchange. A patterned glass buffer layer defines the interferometer's sensing and reference arms. A silicone-rubber cell arrangement brings sample analytes into contact with proteins immobilized on the integrated-optical waveguide surface. Data obtained for antigen-antibody binding of the proteins human Immunoglobulin-G and staph enterotoxin-B indicate that a 50 - 100 ng/ml concentration levels can be measured in less than ten minutes.

Paper Details

Date Published: 21 May 1993
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 1886, Fiber Optic Sensors in Medical Diagnostics, (21 May 1993); doi: 10.1117/12.144843
Show Author Affiliations
Anthony A. Boiarski, Battelle Memorial Institute/Columbus Div. (United States)
James R. Busch, Battelle Memorial Institute/Columbus Div. (United States)
Ballwant S. Bhullar, Battelle Memorial Institute/Columbus Div. (United States)
Richard W. Ridgway, Battelle Memorial Institute/Columbus Div. (United States)
Larry S. Miller, Battelle Memorial Institute/Columbus Div. (United States)
A. W. Zulich, ERDEC (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1886:
Fiber Optic Sensors in Medical Diagnostics
Fred P. Milanovich, Editor(s)

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