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Proceedings Paper

Photorefractive crystals: barium titanate
Author(s): Ye Yung Teng; Chuen Wong
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Paper Abstract

Barium titanate is one of the photorefractive crystals. It has extremely large electro-optic coefficients (r42 equals r51 equals 1640 pm/v) which give rise to an efficient photorefractive effect. It has wide applications in volume hologram storage for high capacity optical memories, real-time information processing, real-time holography and interferometry, coherent light amplification, integrated optics, and laser applications. The growth from two different TiO2 sources and fabrication in oxygen partial pressure between 1 and 10-17 atm for commercial BaTiO3 crystals are discussed. The optical constants of barium titanate crystals from the UV to the far infrared were compiled from various literatures, and the results are presented. Single domain barium titanate crystals exhibit unusual scattering and fanning phenomena. Some models which contribute to this effect are described, and an analysis related to the experimental observations is presented. The changes in response (writing) time, decay (storage) time, and diffraction efficiency of barium titanate crystals as a function of temperature ranging from room temperature to about 100 degree(s)C were measured by non-degenerate four-wave mixing and self-pumped phase conjugate experiments. These results also are discussed.

Paper Details

Date Published: 11 May 1993
PDF: 1 pages
Proc. SPIE 1979, 1992 International Conference on Lasers and Optoelectronics, (11 May 1993); doi: 10.1117/12.144091
Show Author Affiliations
Ye Yung Teng, Univ. of Massachusetts/Lowell (United States)
Chuen Wong, Univ. of Massachusetts/Lowell (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1979:
1992 International Conference on Lasers and Optoelectronics

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