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Proceedings Paper

GIS operators requiring spatial context and their implications for remote sensing
Author(s): Gerald J. Kinn
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Paper Abstract

Spatial information, analysis, and modeling systems that are used to study the environment require a rich set of operators, and a well designed set of interfaces to be effective. Without the correct operators or functionality, the systems fall short of being able to represent the complexity that is present in the world. Despite years of research and development in spatial computing, there are still technical voids related to languages, operators, interfaces, and processing capabilities related to the handling of complex spatial relationships. This is especially true when considering problems that work with temporal data sets. The position of an object in the environment, the relationship of that object to other objects and the terrain, and its own inherent function at a point in time can be thought of as the spatial context associated with that object. This context is important if we are interpreting a remotely sensed image, analyzing the data in a Geographic Information System (GIS) to resolve the location of a proposed facility, modeling the physical phenomenon, or attempting to model the behavior of an animal in its habitat. This paper discusses the form of the operators that incorporate spatial context, approaches for their implementation, and illustrate how these operators help integrate the remote sensing methods with GIS.

Paper Details

Date Published: 26 March 1993
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 1819, Digital Image Processing and Visual Communications Technologies in the Earth and Atmospheric Sciences II, (26 March 1993); doi: 10.1117/12.142193
Show Author Affiliations
Gerald J. Kinn, The Analytic Sciences Corp. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1819:
Digital Image Processing and Visual Communications Technologies in the Earth and Atmospheric Sciences II
Mark J. Carlotto, Editor(s)

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