Share Email Print

Proceedings Paper

Cryogenic infrared radiance instrumentation for shuttle (CIRRIS 1A) instrumentation and flight performance
Author(s): Brent Y. Bartschi; Allan J. Steed; Jeffery G. Blakeley; Mark Ahmadjian; Jack Griffin; Richard M. Nadile
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

The Cryogenic Infrared Radiance Instrumentation for Shuttle (CIRRIS 1A) instrument, launched on the Shuttle Discovery (STS-39) on 28 April 1991, was developed to characterize the phenomenology and dynamics of ionospheric processes. The primary objective of the CIRRIS 1A mission was to obtain spectral and spatial measurements of infrared atmospheric emissions in the spectral region between 2.5 and 25 microns over altitudes ranging from the Earth's surface to 260 km. The primary sensors are a Michelson interferometer/spectrometer and a multi-spectral radiometer, which share a common high off-axis rejection telescope. The sensor/telescope complex is enclosed in a cyogenic dewar. Excellent data were obtained from this mission, and preliminary analysis shows that all sensors performed well. This paper describes the experiment hardware, summarizes instrument performance during flight, and presents examples of significant results.

Paper Details

Date Published: 21 January 1993
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 1765, Cryogenic Optical Systems and Instruments V, (21 January 1993); doi: 10.1117/12.140895
Show Author Affiliations
Brent Y. Bartschi, Utah State Univ. (United States)
Allan J. Steed, Utah State Univ. (United States)
Jeffery G. Blakeley, Utah State Univ. (United States)
Mark Ahmadjian, Air Force Phillips Lab. (United States)
Jack Griffin, Air Force Phillips Lab. (United States)
Richard M. Nadile, Air Force Phillips Lab. (United States)

Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1765:
Cryogenic Optical Systems and Instruments V
Ramsey K. Melugin, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top