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Proceedings Paper

Detection of urban O3, NO2, H2CO, and SO2 using Fourier transform spectroscopy
Author(s): Ann Carine Vandaele; Michel R. Carleer; Reginald Colin; Paul C. Simon
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Paper Abstract

Concentrations of SO2, NO2, H2CO, and O3 have been measured regularly since October 1990 at the urban site of the Campus of the Universite Libre de Bruxelles, using the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique associated with a Fourier Transform Spectrometer. The experimental set up has already been described elsewhere (Vandaele et al., 1992). It consists of a source (either a high pressure xenon lamp or a tungsten filament) and an 800 m long path system. The spectra are recorded in the 26,000 - 38,000 cm-1 and 14,000 - 30,000 cm-1 spectral regions, at the dispersion of 7.7 cm-1. The analytical method of the DOAS technique is based on the fact that in atmospheric measurements, it is impossible to obtain an experimental blank spectrum. Therefore, the Beer-Lambert law has to be rewritten as: I equals I'oen(Delta (sigma) d) where I is the measured intensity, Io the measured intensity from which all absorption structures have been removed, n the concentration, d the optical path length, and (Delta) (sigma) the differential absorption cross section of the molecule. Numerous methods for determining I'o exist. Fourier transform filtering has been used in this work. This method defines I'o as the inverse Fourier transform of the lower frequencies portion of the power spectrum of the experimental data. A least squares procedure is then applied in order to determine the concentration of the desired molecules.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 February 1993
PDF: 5 pages
Proc. SPIE 1715, Optical Methods in Atmospheric Chemistry, (12 February 1993); doi: 10.1117/12.140187
Show Author Affiliations
Ann Carine Vandaele, Institut d'Aeronomie Spatiale de Belgique (Belgium)
Michel R. Carleer, Univ. Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium)
Reginald Colin, Univ. Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium)
Paul C. Simon, Institut d'Aeronomie Spatiale de Belgique (Belgium)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1715:
Optical Methods in Atmospheric Chemistry

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