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Proceedings Paper

Composite network using PLC and SCM technologies
Author(s): Toshiyuki Tsuchiya; Kazuyoshi Ohno; Takashi Shiraishi; Masaya Okada
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Paper Abstract

The study of integrated opto-electrical circuits has lead to the evolution of silica-based planer lightwave circuit (PLC) technology. PLC technology can be applied to the filtering of optical signals. Optical filters for AM-FDM signals that use the subcarrier multiplexing (SCM) technique can access two optical carrier wavelengths simultaneously, and can be used with point-to-multipoint wiring using coaxial cable to home videos. The use of optical fibers in subscriber networks has become a priority in telecommunications and video transmissions. In our network, the optical network unit (ONU) which is installed in an outside plant is designed so that three kinds of optical fiber systems are terminated simultaneously. They are for the video fiber backbone, personal communications and narrow band ISDN. The radius of the service area offered by the ONU is a few hundred meters. This network configuration is suitable for powering and operation, administration and maintenance (OA&M) from the viewpoint of feeder fiber network design.

Paper Details

Date Published: 2 February 1993
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 1786, Fiber Networks for Voice, Video, and Multimedia Services, (2 February 1993); doi: 10.1117/12.139298
Show Author Affiliations
Toshiyuki Tsuchiya, NTT Network Systems Development Ctr. (Japan)
Kazuyoshi Ohno, NTT Network Systems Development Ctr. (Japan)
Takashi Shiraishi, NTT Network Systems Development Ctr. (Japan)
Masaya Okada, NTT Network Systems Development Ctr. (Japan)

Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1786:
Fiber Networks for Voice, Video, and Multimedia Services
Aleksander T. Futro; Lynn D. Hutcheson; Howard L. Lemberg, Editor(s)

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