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Proceedings Paper

Development of procedures and instrumentation for use of the Nd:YAG laser in the ablation of metastases from colorectal cancer
Author(s): Kenneth Eugene Bartels; Mark H. Mellow; Marilyn Kostolich; George A. Henry; Bradley R. Barnes; Frederic M. Durville; Steven A. Schafer; Jerzy S. Krasinski; Richard C. Powell
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Paper Abstract

While many colon cancers are curable, curability relates closely to stage. Once disease is spread beyond the confines of the colon and adjacent lymph nodes, cure is clearly the exception rather than the rule. Recently, surgical resection of solitary liver metastases has been effective in treatment of colon cancer, producing long term survival in approximately 20% of treatable patients. Surgery, however, is technically complex and there is a high perioperative morbidity and substantial perioperative mortality. For patients with multiple hepatic metastases in whom surgical extirpation is not possible, the outlook is dismal. Other modalities including chemotherapy have also resulted in limited success. Recently, a number of investigators have evaluated the effect of low power interstitial Nd:YAG laser irradiation for inducing hyperthermia and coagulative necrosis is hepatic tissue. In treating multiple or large hepatic metastases, the use of a lower power (1 - 5 watts), long duration (50 - 2400 seconds), single fiber laser delivery system has limitations. A computer controlled continuous wave Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser system using a single fiber 'coupled' to a multiple array of fibers (4 to 6) has been developed for the delivery of low power laser irradiation to hepatic tissue. The advantage of laser energy being delivered simultaneously through multiple fibers is that it expands the area of tissue that can be treated over a given time. Through the use of interventional techniques including percutaneous ultrasound and/or CAT scan directed treatment, laser induced interstitial hyperthermia for large or multiple metastatic lesions could be initiated without the morbidity associated with open surgical procedures.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 June 1992
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 1643, Laser Surgery: Advanced Characterization, Therapeutics, and Systems III, (1 June 1992); doi: 10.1117/12.137335
Show Author Affiliations
Kenneth Eugene Bartels, Oklahoma State Univ. College of Veterinary Medicine and Baptist Medical Ctr. (United States)
Mark H. Mellow, Oklahoma State Univ. College of Veterinary Medicine and Baptist Medical Ctr. (United States)
Marilyn Kostolich, Oklahoma State Univ. College of Veterinary Medicine and Baptist Medical Ctr. (United States)
George A. Henry, Oklahoma State Univ. College of Veterinary Medicine and Baptist Medical Ctr. (United States)
Bradley R. Barnes, Oklahoma State Univ. College of Veterinary Medicine and Baptist Medical Ctr. (United States)
Frederic M. Durville, Oklahoma State Univ. College of Veterinary Medicine and Baptist Medical Ctr. (United States)
Steven A. Schafer, Oklahoma State Univ. (United States)
Jerzy S. Krasinski, Oklahoma State Univ. College of Veterinary Medicine and Baptist Medical Ctr. (United States)
Richard C. Powell, Oklahoma State Univ. College of Veterinary Medicine and Baptist Medical Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1643:
Laser Surgery: Advanced Characterization, Therapeutics, and Systems III
R. Rox Anderson, Editor(s)

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