Share Email Print
cover

Neurophotonics • Open Access

Prediction of brain tissue temperature using near-infrared spectroscopy
Author(s): Lisa Holper; Subhabrata Mitra; Gemma Bale; Nicola Robertson; Ilias Tachtsidis

Paper Abstract

Broadband near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can provide an endogenous indicator of tissue temperature based on the temperature dependence of the water absorption spectrum. We describe a first evaluation of the calibration and prediction of brain tissue temperature obtained during hypothermia in newborn piglets (animal dataset) and rewarming in newborn infants (human dataset) based on measured body (rectal) temperature. The calibration using partial least squares regression proved to be a reliable method to predict brain tissue temperature with respect to core body temperature in the wavelength interval of 720 to 880 nm with a strong mean predictive power of R 2 = 0.713 ± 0.157 (animal dataset) and R 2 = 0.798 ± 0.087 (human dataset). In addition, we applied regression receiver operating characteristic curves for the first time to evaluate the temperature prediction, which provided an overall mean error bias between NIRS predicted brain temperature and body temperature of 0.436 ± 0.283 ° C (animal dataset) and 0.162 ± 0.149 ° C (human dataset). We discuss main methodological aspects, particularly the well-known aspect of over- versus underestimation between brain and body temperature, which is relevant for potential clinical applications.

Paper Details

Date Published: 13 June 2017
PDF: 14 pages
Neurophoton. 4(2) 021106 doi: 10.1117/1.NPh.4.2.021106
Published in: Neurophotonics Volume 4, Issue 2
Show Author Affiliations
Lisa Holper, Psychiatrische Universitätsklinik Zürich (Switzerland)
Subhabrata Mitra, Univ. College London (United Kingdom)
Univ. College London Hospitals Trust (United Kingdom)
Institute for Women’s Health (United Kingdom)
Gemma Bale, Univ. College London (United Kingdom)
Nicola Robertson, Univ. College London (United Kingdom)
Univ. College London Hospitals Trust (United Kingdom)
Institute for Women’s Health (United Kingdom)
Ilias Tachtsidis, Univ. College London (United Kingdom)


© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top