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Neurophotonics • Open Access

Alternating current and infrared produce an onset-free reversible nerve block
Author(s): Emilie H. Lothet; Kevin L. Kilgore; Niloy Bhadra; Narendra Bhadra; Tina Vrabec; Yves T. Wang; E. Duco Jansen; Michael W. Jenkins; Hillel J. Chiel

Paper Abstract

Nerve block can eliminate spasms and chronic pain. Kilohertz frequency alternating current (KHFAC) produces a safe and reversible nerve block. However, KHFAC-induced nerve block is associated with an undesirable onset response. Optical inhibition using infrared (IR) laser light can produce nerve block without an onset response, but heats nerves. Combining KHFAC with IR inhibition [alternating current and infrared (ACIR)] produces a rapidly reversible nerve block without an onset response. ACIR can be used to rapidly and reversibly provide onset-free nerve block in the unmyelinated nerves of the marine mollusk <italic<Aplysia californica</italic< and may have significant advantages over either modality alone. ACIR may be of great clinical utility in the future.

Paper Details

Date Published: 28 July 2014
PDF: 3 pages
1(1) 011010 doi: 10.1117/1.NPh.1.1.011010
Published in: Neurophotonics Volume 1, Issue 1
Show Author Affiliations
Emilie H. Lothet, Case Western Reserve Univ. (United States)
Kevin L. Kilgore, MetroHealth Medical Ctr. (United States)
Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Cr. (United States)
Case Western Reserve Univ. (United States)
Niloy Bhadra, Case Western Reserve Univ. (United States)
Narendra Bhadra, Case Western Reserve Univ. (United States)
Tina Vrabec, Case Western Reserve Univ. (United States)
Yves T. Wang, Case Western Reserve Univ. (United States)
E. Duco Jansen, Vanderbilt Univ. (United States)
Michael W. Jenkins, Case Western Reserve Univ. (United States)
Hillel J. Chiel, Case Western Reserve Univ. (United States)


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