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Journal of Applied Remote Sensing

Quantifying the anthropogenic impact on groundwater resources of North China using Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment data and land surface models
Author(s): Bassem Mohsen Ebead; Mohamed Elsayed Ahmed; Zheng Niu; Ni Huang
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Paper Abstract

The North China Plain contains 65% of the country’s agricultural land and 24% of its fresh water resources. Monthly (January 2003 to December 2012) Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data were used to quantify anthropogenic impacts on groundwater depletion rates in the northern China region; areas include the North China Plain and surroundings. Nongroundwater components of GRACE-derived terrestrial water storage (TWS) were removed using the outputs of the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5) spanning the same period. Results indicate that the northern China region witnessed a TWS depletion of 14.09 ± 1.74 × 10 9    m 3 / year ( 9.39 ± 1.16    mm / year ). The GRACE-derived groundwater depletion rate was estimated at 12.78 ± 1.56 × 10 9    m 3 / year ( 8.52 ± 1.04    mm / year ), which represents 91% of the GRACE-derived TWS trend. Variations in combined soil moisture, snow, vegetation canopy, and river channel storages are minimal (9%) across northern China region. Anthropogenic variations in groundwater depletion rates were estimated at 19.50 ± 1.71 × 10 9    m 3 / year

Paper Details

Date Published: 7 June 2017
PDF: 13 pages
J. Appl. Rem. Sens. 11(2) 026029 doi: 10.1117/1.JRS.11.026029
Published in: Journal of Applied Remote Sensing Volume 11, Issue 2
Show Author Affiliations
Bassem Mohsen Ebead, Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth (China)
Mohamed Elsayed Ahmed, Western Michigan Univ. (United States)
Suez Canal Univ. (Egypt)
Zheng Niu, Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth (China)
Ni Huang, Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth (China)


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