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Journal of Applied Remote Sensing • Open Access

Integrating seasonal optical and thermal infrared spectra to characterize urban impervious surfaces with extreme spectral complexity: a Shanghai case study
Author(s): Wei Wang; Xinfeng Yao; Minhe Ji

Paper Abstract

Despite recent rapid advancement in remote sensing technology, accurate mapping of the urban landscape in China still faces a great challenge due to unusually high spectral complexity in many big cities. Much of this complication comes from severe spectral confusion of impervious surfaces with polluted water bodies and bright bare soils. This paper proposes a two-step land cover decomposition method, which combines optical and thermal spectra from different seasons to cope with the issue of urban spectral complexity. First, a linear spectral mixture analysis was employed to generate fraction images for three preliminary endmembers (high albedo, low albedo, and vegetation). Seasonal change analysis on land surface temperature induced from thermal infrared spectra and coarse component fractions obtained from the first step was then used to reduce the confusion between impervious surfaces and nonimpervious materials. This method was tested with two-date Landsat multispectral data in Shanghai, one of China’s megacities. The results showed that the method was capable of consistently estimating impervious surfaces in highly complex urban environments with an accuracy of R2 greater than 0.70 and both root mean square error and mean average error less than 0.20 for all test sites. This strategy seemed very promising for landscape mapping of complex urban areas.

Paper Details

Date Published: 25 February 2016
PDF: 16 pages
J. Appl. Remote Sens. 10(1) 016018 doi: 10.1117/1.JRS.10.016018
Published in: Journal of Applied Remote Sensing Volume 10, Issue 1
Show Author Affiliations
Wei Wang, East China Normal Univ. (China)
Xinfeng Yao, Shanghai Academy of Agricultural Sciences (China)
Minhe Ji, East China Normal Univ. (China)


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