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Journal of Biomedical Optics • Open Access • new

Reproducibility of parameters of postocclusive reactive hyperemia measured by diffuse optical tomography
Author(s): Ernesto E. Vidal-Rosas; Stephen A. Billings; Timothy J. Chico; Daniel Coca

Paper Abstract

The application of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to assess microvascular function has shown promising results. An important limitation when using a single source-detector pair, however, is the lack of depth sensitivity. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) overcomes this limitation using an array of sources and detectors that allow the reconstruction of volumetric hemodynamic changes. This study compares the key parameters of postocclusive reactive hyperemia measured in the forearm using standard NIRS and DOT. We show that while the mean parameter values are similar for the two techniques, DOT achieves much better reproducibility, as measured by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). We show that DOT achieves high reproducibility for muscle oxygen consumption (ICC: 0.99), time to maximal HbO2 (ICC: 0.94), maximal HbO2 (ICC: 0.99), and time to maximal HbT (ICC: 0.99). Absolute reproducibility as measured by the standard error of measurement is consistently smaller and close to zero (ideal value) across all parameters measured by DOT compared to NIRS. We conclude that DOT provides a more robust characterization of the reactive hyperemic response and show how the availability of volumetric hemodynamic changes allows the identification of areas of temporal consistency, which could help characterize more precisely the microvasculature.

Paper Details

Date Published: 15 June 2016
PDF: 11 pages
J. Biomed. Opt. 21(6) 066012 doi: 10.1117/1.JBO.21.6.066012
Published in: Journal of Biomedical Optics Volume 21, Issue 6
Show Author Affiliations
Ernesto E. Vidal-Rosas, The Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom)
Stephen A. Billings, The Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom)
Timothy J. Chico, The Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom)
Daniel Coca, The Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom)


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