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Journal of Biomedical Optics • Open Access

Quantifying hyperoxia-mediated damage to mammalian respiratory cilia-driven fluid flow using particle tracking velocimetry optical coherence tomography
Author(s): Ute Alice Gamm; Brendan K. Huang; Mansoor Ali Syed; Xuchen Zhang; Vineet Bhandari; Michael A. Choma

Paper Abstract

Oxygen supplementation [hyperoxia, increased fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2)] is an indispensable treatment in the intensive care unit for patients in respiratory failure. Like other treatments or drugs, hyperoxia has a risk-benefit profile that guides its clinical use. While hyperoxia is known to damage respiratory epithelium, it is unknown if damage can result in impaired capacity to generate cilia-driven fluid flow. Here, we demonstrate that quantifying cilia-driven fluid flow velocities in the sub-100 μm/s regime (sub-0.25 in./min regime) reveals hyperoxia-mediated damage to the capacity of ciliated respiratory mucosa to generate directional flow. Flow quantification was performed using particle tracking velocimetry optical coherence tomography (PTV-OCT) in ex vivo mouse trachea. The ability of PTV-OCT to detect biomedically relevant flow perturbations in the sub-100 μm/s regime was validated by quantifying temperature- and drug-mediated modulation of flow performance in ex vivo mouse trachea. Overall, PTV-OCT imaging of cilia-driven fluid flow in ex vivo mouse trachea is a powerful and straightforward approach for studying factors that modulate and damage mammalian respiratory ciliary physiology.

Paper Details

Date Published: 26 August 2015
PDF: 4 pages
J. Biomed. Opt. 20(8) 080505 doi: 10.1117/1.JBO.20.8.080505
Published in: Journal of Biomedical Optics Volume 20, Issue 8
Show Author Affiliations
Ute Alice Gamm, Yale School of Medicine (United States)
Brendan K. Huang, Yale School of Medicine (United States)
Mansoor Ali Syed, Yale School of Medicine (United States)
Xuchen Zhang, Yale School of Medicine (United States)
Vineet Bhandari, Yale School of Medicine (United States)
Michael A. Choma, Yale School of Medicine (United States)


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