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Journal of Biomedical Optics

Spatial frequency analysis of high-density lipoprotein and iron-oxide nanoparticle transmission electron microscope image structure for pattern recognition in heterogeneous fields
Author(s): Stewart Russell; Thien An Nguyen; Clyde Rey Torres; Stephen Bhagroo; Milo J. Russell; Robert R. Alfano
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Paper Abstract

The optical spatial frequencies of tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) are investigated. As a concentrated colloidal suspension of interacting native nanoparticles, the TIF can develop internal ordering under shear stress that may hinder delivery of antitumor agents within tumors. A systematic method is presented to characterize the TIF nanometer-scale microstructure in a model suspension of superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles and reconstituted high-density lipoprotein by Fourier spatial frequency (FSF) analysis so as to differentiate between jammed and fluid structural features in static transmission electron microscope images. The FSF method addresses one obstacle faced in achieving quantitative dosimetry to neoplastic tissue, that of detecting these nanoscale barriers to transport, such as would occur in the extravascular space immediately surrounding target cells.

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 January 2014
PDF: 8 pages
J. Biomed. Opt. 19(1) 015004 doi: 10.1117/1.JBO.19.1.015004
Published in: Journal of Biomedical Optics Volume 19, Issue 1
Show Author Affiliations
Stewart Russell, Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth (United States)
Thien An Nguyen, The City College of New York (United States)
Clyde Rey Torres, The City College of New York (United States)
Stephen Bhagroo, The City College of New York (United States)
Milo J. Russell, The City College of New York (United States)
Robert R. Alfano, The City College of New York (United States)


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