Share Email Print
cover

Journal of Biomedical Optics • Open Access

Infrared laser thermal fusion of blood vessels: preliminary ex vivo tissue studies

Paper Abstract

Suture ligation of blood vessels during surgery can be time-consuming and skill-intensive. Energy-based, electrosurgical, and ultrasonic devices have recently replaced the use of sutures and mechanical clips (which leave foreign objects in the body) for many surgical procedures, providing rapid hemostasis during surgery. However, these devices have the potential to create an undesirably large collateral zone of thermal damage and tissue necrosis. We explore an alternative energy-based technology, infrared lasers, for rapid and precise thermal coagulation and fusion of the blood vessel walls. Seven near-infrared lasers (808, 980, 1075, 1470, 1550, 1850 to 1880, and 1908 nm) were tested during preliminary tissue studies. Studies were performed using fresh porcine renal vessels, ex vivo, with native diameters of 1 to 6 mm, and vessel walls flattened to a total thickness of 0.4 mm. A linear beam profile was applied normal to the vessel for narrow, full-width thermal coagulation. The laser irradiation time was 5 s. Vessel burst pressure measurements were used to determine seal strength. The 1470 nm laser wavelength demonstrated the capability of sealing a wide range of blood vessels from 1 to 6 mm diameter with burst strengths of 578±154 , 530±171 , and 426±174  mmHg for small, medium, and large vessel diameters, respectively. Lateral thermal coagulation zones (including the seal) measured 1.0±0.4  mm on vessels sealed at this wavelength. Other laser wavelengths (1550, 1850 to 1880, and 1908 nm) were also capable of sealing vessels, but were limited by lower vessel seal pressures, excessive charring, and/or limited power output preventing treatment of large vessels (<4  mm outer diameter).

Paper Details

Date Published: 2 May 2013
PDF: 7 pages
J. Biomed. Opt. 18(5) 058001 doi: 10.1117/1.JBO.18.5.058001
Published in: Journal of Biomedical Optics Volume 18, Issue 5
Show Author Affiliations
Christopher M. Cilip, The Univ. of North Carolina at Charlotte (United States)
Sarah B. Rosenbury, The Univ. of North Carolina at Charlotte (United States)
Nicholas C. Giglio, The Univ. of North Carolina at Charlotte (United States)
Thomas C. Hutchens, The Univ. of North Carolina at Charlotte (United States)
Gino R. Schweinsberger, The Univ. of North Carolina at Charlotte (United States)
Duane E. Kerr, Covidien (United States)
Cassandra Latimer, Covidien (United States)
William H. Nau, Covidien (United States)
Nathaniel M. Fried, The Univ. of North Carolina at Charlotte (United States)


© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top