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Journal of Biomedical Optics • Open Access

Dynamic optical projection of acquired luminescence for aiding oncologic surgery

Paper Abstract

Optical imaging enables real-time visualization of intrinsic and exogenous contrast within biological tissues. Applications in human medicine have demonstrated the power of fluorescence imaging to enhance visualization in dermatology, endoscopic procedures, and open surgery. Although few optical contrast agents are available for human medicine at this time, fluorescence imaging is proving to be a powerful tool in guiding medical procedures. Recently, intraoperative detection of fluorescent molecular probes that target cell-surface receptors has been reported for improvement in oncologic surgery in humans. We have developed a novel system, optical projection of acquired luminescence (OPAL), to further enhance real-time guidance of open oncologic surgery. In this method, collected fluorescence intensity maps are projected onto the imaged surface rather than via wall-mounted display monitor. To demonstrate proof-of-principle for OPAL applications in oncologic surgery, lymphatic transport of indocyanine green was visualized in live mice for intraoperative identification of sentinel lymph nodes. Subsequently, peritoneal tumors in a murine model of breast cancer metastasis were identified using OPAL after systemic administration of a tumor-selective fluorescent molecular probe. These initial results clearly show that OPAL can enhance adoption and ease-of-use of fluorescence imaging in oncologic procedures relative to existing state-of-the-art intraoperative imaging systems.

Paper Details

Date Published: 27 November 2013
PDF: 4 pages
J. Biomed. Opt. 18(12) 120501 doi: 10.1117/1.JBO.18.12.120501
Published in: Journal of Biomedical Optics Volume 18, Issue 12
Show Author Affiliations
Pinaki Sarder, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States)
Kyle Gullicksrud, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States)
Suman B. Mondal, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States)
Gail P. Sudlow, Washington Univ. School of Medicine in St. Louis (United States)
Samuel Achilefu, Washington Univ. School of Medicine in St. Louis (United States)
Walter J. Akers, Washington Univ. School of Medicine in St. Louis (United States)


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