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Journal of Biomedical Optics

Absolute measurement of cerebral optical coefficients, hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation in old and young adults with near-infrared spectroscopy
Author(s): Bertan Hallacoglu; Angelo Sassaroli; Sergio Fantini; Michael Wysocki; Elizabeth Guerrero-Berroa; Michal S. Beeri; Vahram Haroutunian; Merav Shaul; Irwin H. Rosenberg; Aron Troen
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Paper Abstract

We present near-infrared spectroscopy measurement of absolute cerebral hemoglobin concentration and saturation in a large sample of 36 healthy elderly (mean age, 85±6  years) and 19 young adults (mean age, 28±4  years). Non-invasive measurements were obtained on the forehead using a commercially available multi-distance frequency-domain system and analyzed using a diffusion theory model for a semi-infinite, homogeneous medium with semi-infinite boundary conditions. Our study included repeat measurements, taken five months apart, on 16 elderly volunteers that demonstrate intra-subject reproducibility of the absolute measurements with cross-correlation coefficients of 0.9 for absorption coefficient (μa), oxy-hemoglobin concentration ([HbO2]), and total hemoglobin concentration ([HbT]), 0.7 for deoxy-hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]), 0.8 for hemoglobin oxygen saturation (StO2), and 0.7 for reduced scattering coefficient (μ′s). We found significant differences between the two age groups. Compared to young subjects, elderly subjects had lower cerebral [HbO2], [Hb], [HbT], and StO2 by 10±4  μM, 4±3  μM, 14±5  μM, and 6%±5%, respectively. Our results demonstrate the reliability and robustness of multi-distance near-infrared spectroscopy measurements based on a homogeneous model in the human forehead on a large sample of human subjects. Absolute, non-invasive optical measurements on the brain, such as those presented here, can significantly advance the development of NIRS technology as a tool for monitoring resting/basal cerebral perfusion, hemodynamics, oxygenation, and metabolism.

Paper Details

Date Published: 14 May 2012
PDF: 9 pages
J. Biomed. Opt. 17(8) 081406 doi: 10.1117/1.JBO.17.8.081406
Published in: Journal of Biomedical Optics Volume 17, Issue 8
Show Author Affiliations
Bertan Hallacoglu, Tufts Univ. (United States)
Angelo Sassaroli, Tufts Univ. (United States)
Sergio Fantini, Tufts Univ. (United States)
Michael Wysocki, Mount Sinai School of Medicine (United States)
Elizabeth Guerrero-Berroa, Mount Sinai School of Medicine (United States)
Michal S. Beeri, Mount Sinai School of Medicine (United States)
Vahram Haroutunian, Mount Sinai School of Medicine (United States)
Merav Shaul, Tufts Univ. (United States)
Irwin H. Rosenberg, Tufts Univ. (United States)
Aron Troen, Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel)


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