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Journal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments, and Systems

Radiation tolerance of a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode imaging array
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Paper Abstract

Radiation testing results for a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GM-APD) array-based imager are reviewed. Radiation testing is a crucial step in technology development that assesses the readiness of a specific device or instrument for space-based missions or other missions in high-radiation environments. Pre- and postradiation values for breakdown voltage, dark count rate (DCR), after pulsing probability, photon detection efficiency (PDE), crosstalk probability, and intrapixel sensitivity are presented. Details of the radiation testing setup and experiment are provided. The devices were exposed to a total dose of 50 krad(Si) at the Massachusetts General Hospital’s Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, using monoenergetic 60 MeV protons as the radiation source. This radiation dose is equivalent to radiation absorbed over 10 solar cycles at an L2 orbit with 1-cm aluminum shielding. The DCR increased by 2.3  e−/s/pix/krad(Si) at 160 K, the afterpulsing probability increased at all temperatures and settings by a factor of ∼2, and the effective breakdown voltage shifted by +1.5  V. PDE, crosstalk probability, and intrapixel sensitivity were unchanged by radiation damage. The performance of the GM-APD imaging array is compared to the performance of the CCD on board the ASCA satellite with a similar radiation shield and radiation environment.

Paper Details

Date Published: 6 July 2016
PDF: 12 pages
J. Ast. Inst. Sys. 2(3) 036001 doi: 10.1117/1.JATIS.2.3.036001
Published in: Journal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments, and Systems Volume 2, Issue 3
Show Author Affiliations
Kimberly E. Kolb, Rochester Institute of Technology (United States)
Donald F. Figer, Rochester Institute of Technology (United States)
Joong Y. Lee, Rochester Institute of Technology (United States)
Brandon J. Hanold, Rochester Institute of Technology (United States)


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