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Optical Engineering

High-resolution method for measuring the torsional deformation of a dragonfly wing by combining a displacement probe with an acousto-optic deflector
Author(s): LiJiang Zeng; Hirokazu Matsumoto; Shigeru Sunada; Keiji Kawachi
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Paper Abstract

To better understand the passive torsional motion and to quantify the torsional motion of an insect, we developed a new scanning beam method that can measure with high resolution the variation in both the torsion angle and shape of an insect wing during pure flapping motion. This new method is based on the conventional principle used in a laser beam displacement probe with a position detector, but introduces the use of an acousto-optic deflector, which enables us to pass the scanning laser beam over the wing. Therefore, by measuring the relative displacement between the beam spots on the wing, we can determine the passive variation in both the torsion angle and shape of an insect wing with high resolution. According to the waveform supplied to the acousto-optic deflector, we define both a two-point scanning method, which we use to measure the variation in torsion angle, and a multipoint scanning method, which we use to measure the variation in shape. We apply these methods to a dragonfly wing at different flapping frequencies, and compare the results with those determined using a high-speed video camera. The good agreement between the two methods shows that the scanning beam method can be effectively applied in the field of biomechanics to study the torsion angle variation and shape variation of an insect wing.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 February 1996
PDF: 7 pages
Opt. Eng. 35(2) doi: 10.1117/1.600924
Published in: Optical Engineering Volume 35, Issue 2
Show Author Affiliations
LiJiang Zeng, Research Development Corp. of Japan (China)
Hirokazu Matsumoto, National Research Lab. of Metrology (Japan)
Shigeru Sunada, Research Development Corp. of Japan (Japan)
Keiji Kawachi, Research Development Corp. of Japan (Japan)


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