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Journal of Biomedical Optics • Open Access

Transillumination hyperspectral imaging for histopathological examination of excised tissue

Paper Abstract

Angular domain spectroscopic imaging (ADSI) is a novel technique for the detection and characterization of optical contrast in turbid media based on spectral characteristics. The imaging system employs a silicon micromachined angular filter array to reject scattered light traversing a specimen and an imaging spectrometer to capture and discriminate the largely remaining quasiballistic light based on spatial position and wavelength. The imaging modality results in hyperspectral shadowgrams containing two-dimensional (2D) spatial maps of spectral information. An ADSI system was constructed and its performance was evaluated in the near-infrared region on tissue-mimicking phantoms. Image-based spectral correlation analysis using transmission spectra and first order derivatives revealed that embedded optical targets could be resolved. The hyperspectral images obtained with ADSI were observed to depend on target concentration, target depth, and scattering level of the background medium. A similar analysis on a muscle and tumor sample dissected from a mouse resulted in spatially dependent optical transmission spectra that were distinct, which suggested that ADSI may find utility in classifying tissues in biomedical applications.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 August 2011
PDF: 12 pages
J. Biomed. Opt. 16(8) 086014 doi: 10.1117/1.3623410
Published in: Journal of Biomedical Optics Volume 16, Issue 8
Show Author Affiliations
Fartash Vasefi, Lawson Health Research Institute (Canada)
Mohamadreza Najiminaini, Lawson Health Research Institute (Canada)
Eldon Ng, Lawson Health Research Institute (Canada)
Astrid Chamson-Reig, Lawson Health Research Institute (Canada)
Jeffrey J. L. Carson, Lawson Health Research Institute (Canada)
Bozena Kaminska, Simon Fraser Univ. (Canada)
Muriel Brackstone, The Univ. of Western Ontario (Canada)


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