Share Email Print
cover

Journal of Biomedical Optics

Effect of low-level laser treatment of tissue-engineered skin substitutes: contraction of collagen lattices
Author(s): Gideon Ho; Joseph C. Barbenel; Mary Helen Grant
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $20.00 $25.00

Paper Abstract

Fibroblast-populated collagen lattices (FPCL) are widely used in tissue-engineered artificial skin substitutes, but their main drawback is that interaction of fibroblasts and matrix causes contraction of the lattice, reducing it to about 20% of its original area. The effect of low-level laser treatment (LLLT) on the behavior of 3T3 fibroblasts seeded in collagen lattices containing 20% chondroitin-6-sulphate was investigated to determine whether LLLT could control the contraction of FPCL. A He-Ne laser was used at 632.8 nm to deliver a 5-mW continuous wave with fluences from 1 to 4 J/cm2. Laser treatment at 3 J/cm2 increased contraction of collagen lattices in the absence of cells but decreased contraction of cell seeded lattices over a 7-day period. The effect was energy dependent and was not observed at 1, 2, or 4 J/cm2. There was no alteration in fibroblast viability, morphology, or mitochondrial membrane potential after any laser treatments, but the distribution of actin fibers within the cells and collagen fibers in the matrices was disturbed at 3 J/cm2. These effects contribute to the decrease in contraction observed. LLLT may offer a means to control contraction of FPCL used as artificial skin substitutes.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 May 2009
PDF: 8 pages
J. Biomed. Opt. 14(3) 034002 doi: 10.1117/1.3127201
Published in: Journal of Biomedical Optics Volume 14, Issue 3
Show Author Affiliations
Gideon Ho, Exploit Technologies Private Ltd. (Singapore)
Joseph C. Barbenel, Univ. of Strathclyde (United Kingdom)
Mary Helen Grant, Univ. of Strathclyde (United Kingdom)


© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top