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Spie Press Book

Tribute to Emil Wolf: Science and Engineering Legacy of Physical Optics
Editor(s): Tomasz P. Jannson
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Book Description

An icon in the world of optics, Emil Wolf laid the foundations of contemporary physical optics by documenting the concept of spatial coherence before lasers were introduced. This powerful concept has influenced many areas of optical science and engineering, several of which are discussed in this book and are intended to pay homage to one of the great minds of physical optics.

The material is presented by major experts in the field, many of them closely connected to Emil Wolf's Institute of Optics at University of Rochester.


Book Details

Date Published: 23 December 2004
Pages: 536
ISBN: 9780819454416
Volume: PM139

Table of Contents
SHOW Table of Contents | HIDE Table of Contents
Preface / xiii
KMJ / xvii
List of Contributors / xix
Acknowledgments / xxiii
Chapter 1. Guide, Philosopher, and Friend / 1
Brian J. Thompson
1.1 Introduction / 1
1.2 Manchester 1955-1959 / 2
1.3 1958-1968 Various Locations / 18
1.4 The University of Rochester 1968 - / 20
1.5 Conclusion / 25
Acknowledgments / 26
References / 26
Chapter 2. Recollections of Max Born / 29
Emil Wolf
2.1 Introduction / 30
2.2 The Start of Collaboration / 32
2.3 Arrival at Edinburgh / 33
2.4 Work at Edinburgh / 34
2.5 Born's Revered Teacher / 36
2.6 Resistance to New Discoveries / 38
2.7 Kind and Compassionate / 40
2.8 Life in Retirement / 44
2.9 Olivia / 46
Acknowledgments / 49
References / 49
Chapter 3. What Polarization of Light Is: The Contribution of EmilWolf / 51
Christian Brosseau
3.1 Introduction and Scope / 51
3.2 Basic Principles and Some Applications / 60
3.3 Additional Remarks and Future Directions / 86
Acknowledgments / 89
References / 89
Emil Wolf's Influence / 92
Chapter 4. Electromagnetic Theory of Optical Coherence / 95
Ari T. Friberg
4.1 Introduction / 95
4.2 Fundamental Scalar Results / 96
4.3 Electric Cross-Spectral Density Matrix / 98
4.4 Spectral Changes / 99
4.5 Degree of Polarization / 101
4.6 Coherence of Electromagnetic Fields / 104
4.7 Conclusions / 110
Acknowledgments / 110
References / 111
Chapter 5. Physical Optics at Physical Optics Corporation / 115
Tomasz P. Jannson
5.1 Introduction / 115
5.2 Non-Lambertian Diffusers Theory / 116
5.3 Non-Lambertian Diffusers Experiment / 127
5.4 Physical Radiometry at POC / 129
5.5 Optics and Imaging at POC / 133
5.6 Conclusions / 133
References / 134
Acknowledgments / 138
Chapter 6. Microscopic Origin of Spatial Coherence andWolf Shifts / 141
Girish S. Agarwal
6.1 Introduction / 141
6.2 Microscopic Origin of Source Correlations / 143
6.3 Source Correlation-Induced Two-Photon Resonance / 145
6.4 Spatial Coherence and Emission in Presence of a Mirror / 145
6.5 Spatial Coherence-Induced Control of Nonlinear Generation / 146
6.6 Universality of Wolf Shift / 148
6.7 Fluctuating Pulses in a Dispersive Medium / 148
6.8 Conclusions / 149
References / 149
Chapter 7. Paradigmfor aWave Description of OpticalMeasurements / 153
Roland Winston, Robert G. Littlejohn, Yupin Sun, and K. A. Snail
7.1 Introduction / 153
7.2 The van Cittert-Zernike Theorem / 154
7.3 Measuring Radiance / 154
7.4 Near-Field and Far-Field Limits / 158
7.5 A Wave Description of Measurement / 159
7.6 Focusing and the Instrument Operator / 160
7.7 Measurement by Focusing the Camera on the Source / 162
7.8 Experimental Test of Focusing / 163
7.9 Conclusion / 165
References / 166
Chapter 8. Millimeter Wave MMIC Hologram Beam Former / 169
Vladimir A. Manasson and Lev S. Sadovnik
8.1 Introduction / 169
8.2 Principles of Operation / 169
References / 174
Appendix. A Personal Perspective / 176
Chapter 9. Digital HolographicMicroscopy / 179
Anthony J. Devaney and Pengyi Guo
9.1 Introduction / 179
9.2 Conventional Optical Microscopy / 180
9.3 Holographic Microscopy / 184
9.4 3D Microscopy / 192
9.5 Concluding Remarks / 195
References / 196
Wolf Anecdotes / 198
Chapter 10. Colored Shadows: Diffractive-Optical Cross-Correlations in the Human Eye: the Missing Link between Physics and Psychology, Newton and Goethe / 201
Norbert Lauinger
10.1 Introduction / 202
10.2 Diffractive-Optical Hardware of the Human Eye: The Basis for Spectral Transformations, Cross-Correlations, and Adaptations in Color Vision / 203
10.3 The Missing Links between Physics and Psychology in the Spectral Domain / 209
10.4 Conclusions / 216
References / 217
My Encounters with Emil and Marlies Wolf / 218
Chapter 11. TheWolf Effect in Rough Surface Scattering / 223
Zu-Han Gu, Tamara A. Leskova, Alexei A. Maradudin, and Mikael Ciftan
11.1 Introduction / 223
11.2 Theoretical Study of Changes in the Spectrum of Light Scattered from a Rough Dielectric Film on a Metallic Substrate / 225
11.3 Experimental Studies of Spectral Changes in the Scattering of Light from a Rough Dielectric Film on a Metallic Substrate / 238
11.4 Conclusions / 241
Acknowledgments / 241
References / 242
Chapter 12. Emil Wolf and Optics in the Czech Republic / 247
Jan Perina
12.1 Introduction / 247
12.2 Imaging with Partially Coherent Light of Arbitrary Order / 248
12.3 Phase Problem / 250
12.4 Unified Correlation Tensors / 250
12.5 Arbitrary Ordering of Field Operators / 251
12.6 Generalized Superposition of Signal and Quantum Noise / 254
12.7 Quantum Zeno Effect / 257
12.8 Spectral Coherence / 260
12.9 Nonlinear Optical Couplers / 260
12.10 Conclusion / 262
Acknowledgment / 262
References / 262
Chapter 13. Optical Pathlength Spectroscopy / 267
Aristide Dogariu
13.1 Introduction / 267
13.2 Multiple Light Scattering in Random Media / 268
13.3 Using Coherence to Isolate Scattering Orders / 271
13.4 Applications of OPS / 276
13.5 Conclusion / 284
References / 285
Chapter 14. The Diffractive Multifocal Focusing Effect / 289
John T. Foley, Renat R. Letfullin, and Henk F. Arnoldus
14.1 Introduction / 289
14.2 Fresnel Diffraction by a Circular Aperture / 291
14.3 Fresnel Diffraction by a Bicomponent System of Apertures / 304
14.4 Conclusions / 312
14.A Derivation of Equation (7) / 314
14.B Derivation of Equations (32) and (33) / 315
References / 315
Chapter 15. Young's Interference Experiment: The Long and Short of It / 319
Taco D. Visser
15.1 The Legacy of Thomas Young / 319
15.2 New Physics with Young's Experiment / 321
15.3 Field Correlations in the Far Zone of Young's Experiment / 322
15.4 Phase Singularities of the Coherence Function in the Far Field / 326
15.5 Phase Singularities of the Poynting Vector near the Screen / 330
15.6 Surface Plasmons on the Screen and the Light Transmission Process / 333
15.7 Conclusions / 336
References / 336
Chapter 16. Qualitative Description of theWolf Effect and Differences between the Doppler and the Wolf Shifts / 339
Valerian I. Tatarskii
16.1 Introduction / 339
16.2 The Relation between Interference and the Wolf Effect / 340
16.3 Physics of the Spectrum Changes in Radiation Problems / 348
16.4 Increasing Spatial Coherence in a Process of Propagation / 356
16.5 Differences in the Doppler and the Wolf Shifts / 358
16.6 Conclusions / 360
Acknowledgments / 361
References / 361
Chapter 17. The Significance of Phase and Information / 363
Michael A. Fiddy and H. John Caulfield
17.1 Introduction / 363
17.2 Analyticity and Phase / 365
17.3 On the Absence of Magic / 367
17.4 What is Phase? / 368
17.5 CanWe Do Without Phase? / 369
17.6 The Role of Reference Points / 370
17.7 Phase and Information / 374
17.8 Conclusions / 374
References / 375
Chapter 18. Local Interface Techniques in Wave-Optical Engineering / 379
Frank Wyrowski and Jari Turunen
18.1 Introduction / 379
18.2 Problem Statement / 380
18.3 Rigorous Solutions of the Propagation Problem / 382
18.4 Concept of Local Interface Techniques / 383
18.5 Local Elementary Interface Approximations / 384
18.6 Local Independent Response Approximations / 393
18.7 Extensions to General Fields / 396
18.8 Conclusions / 396
Acknowledgments / 397
References / 397
An Honor and a Pleasure / 399
Chapter 19. Backward Thinking: Holography and the Inverse Problem / 401
H. John Caulfield and Michael A. Fiddy
19.1 Introduction: Inverse Problems / 401
19.2 2D Holograms of 3D Scenes and the Holographic Principle / 403
19.3 Paradigms of Holography / 407
19.4 The Inverse Scattering Problem and Experimental Data / 408
19.5 Resolution, Phase, and EvanescentWaves / 410
19.6 Broadening the Concept of Holography / 411
19.7 Holography in Other Fields: Ultrasound / 412
19.8 Electron Holograms / 415
19.9 Conclusions / 415
References / 416
An Emil Wolf Anecdote / 418
Chapter 20. Several Controversial Topics in Contemporary Optics: Dispersive Pulse Dynamics and the Question of Superluminal Pulse Velocities / 421
Kurt E. Oughstun
20.1 Historical Development of DispersiveWave Theory / 421
20.2 Integral Representation of the Propagated Pulse and Causality / 426
20.3 Havelock's Classical Group Velocity Approximation / 427
20.4 The Modern Asymptotic Theory of Dispersive Optical Pulse Propagation / 430
20.5 Accuracy of the Group Velocity Description of Ultrashort Pulse Dynamics / 435
20.6 The Question of Superluminal Pulse Velocities / 442
20.7 Conclusions / 449
Acknowledgment / 449
References / 450
Chapter 21. Total Internal Reflection Tomography for Three-Dimensional Subwavelength Imaging / 455
David G. Fischer and P. Scott Carney
21.1 Introduction / 455
21.2 Conventional Imaging / 456
21.3 EvanescentWave Illumination / 459
21.4 Three-Dimensional Near-Field Imaging / 462
21.5 Image Reconstruction / 465
21.6 Numerical Simulation / 468
21.7 Experimental Configuration / 471
21.8 Conclusion / 472
Acknowledgments / 473
References / 473
A Personal Note / 474
Chapter 22. Nano-optics: Atoms in the Near Field / 477
Vladilen S. Letokhov
22.1 Introduction / 477
22.2 Atoms in the Vacuum Near Field of a Nanosphere / 478
22.3 Atom Nano-optics: Photon Dots and Photon Holes / 479
22.4 Atom Manipulation in the Near Field / 482
22.5 Atom in the Near Field and Plasmons / 483
22.6 Applications / 485
Acknowledgments / 487
References / 487
Chapter 23. Coherence Issues in Flatland / 491
Adolf W. Lohmann, Avi Pe'er, and Asher A. Friesem
References / 495
Index / 499

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