The Moscone Center
San Francisco, California, United States
2 - 7 February 2019
Technical Events
BiOS Interactive Poster Session (Saturday)
Date: Saturday 2 February 2019
Time: 5:15 PM - 6:45 PM
Conference attendees are invited to attend the BiOS poster session on Saturday evening. Come view the posters, enjoy light refreshments, ask questions, and network with colleagues in your field. Authors of poster papers will be present to answer questions concerning their papers. Attendees are required to wear their conference registration badges to the poster sessions. Poster authors, view poster presentation guidelines and set-up instructions at http://spie.org/PWPosterGuidelines.
ASC OP TF1 - Optical Materials
Date: Sunday 3 February 2019
Time: 8:30 AM - 9:30 AM
The technical and business meetings of the Optics and Electro-Optics Standards Council (OEOSC) are open to anyone with an interest in standards for the optics industry.
ASC OP TF7
Date: Sunday 3 February 2019
Time: 10:00 AM - 11:45 AM
The technical and business meetings of the Optics and Electro-Optics Standards Council (OEOSC) are open to anyone with an interest in standards for the optics industry.
Translational Research Lunchtime Forum
Date: Saturday 2 February 2019
Time: 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM
Join your colleagues in a discussion of outcomes-based studies that can change the lives of patients. Select participants from the Translational Research virtual symposium will have the opportunity to present their methodology and findings. These speakers will demonstrate the use of optical/light-based techniques that are innovative and clever and can change the outcome for patients in a positive and life-giving way.

Translational Research Symposium Chairs


Gabriela Apiou, Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital Research Institute, Harvard Medical School (USA)

Aaron Aguirre, Massachusetts General Hospital (USA)

Program Committee:
Darren Roblyer, Boston Univ. (USA)
ASC OP TF2 - Surface Imperfections
Date: Sunday 3 February 2019
Time: 1:30 PM - 3:15 PM
The technical and business meetings of the Optics and Electro-Optics Standards Council (OEOSC) are open to anyone with an interest in standards for the optics industry.
ASC OP TF4 - Drawings
Date: Sunday 3 February 2019
Time: 3:30 PM - 4:30 PM
The technical and business meetings of the Optics and Electro-Optics Standards Council (OEOSC) are open to anyone with an interest in standards for the optics industry.
BiOS Interactive Poster Session (Sunday)
Date: Sunday 3 February 2019
Time: 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Conference attendees are invited to attend the BiOS poster session on Sunday evening. Come view the posters, enjoy light refreshments, ask questions, and network with colleagues in your field. Authors of poster papers will be present to answer questions concerning their papers. Attendees are required to wear their conference registration badges to the poster sessions. Poster authors, view poster presentation guidelines and set-up instructions at http://spie.org/PWPosterGuidelines.
ASC OP TF3 - Wavefront
Date: Monday 4 February 2019
Time: 8:30 AM - 9:30 AM
The technical and business meetings of the Optics and Electro-Optics Standards Council (OEOSC) are open to anyone with an interest in standards for the optics industry.
ASC OP Business Meeting
Date: Monday 4 February 2019
Time: 10:00 AM - 11:45 AM
The technical and business meetings of the Optics and Electro-Optics Standards Council (OEOSC) are open to anyone with an interest in standards for the optics industry.
Annual TAG Business Meeting
Date: Monday 4 February 2019
Time: 1:30 PM - 3:15 PM
The technical and business meetings of the Optics and Electro-Optics Standards Council (OEOSC) are open to anyone with an interest in standards for the optics industry.
OEOSC Board and Membership Meeting
Date: Monday 4 February 2019
Time: 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
The technical and business meetings of the Optics and Electro-Optics Standards Council (OEOSC) are open to anyone with an interest in standards for the optics industry.
FDA Policies and Procedures: What Academic Investigators and Small Business Should Know
Date: Monday 4 February 2019
Time: 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Chairs: Warren Grundfest, Univ. of California, Los Angeles


Ramesh Raghavachari, U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Come hear speakers from industry and regulatory agencies share their perspectives and advice on incorporating regulatory requirements into product development and how to achieve successful regulatory strategies. In addition, small business owners will gain valuable business perspectives concerning 3rd party review and regulatory approval for medical devices. The event will also include a panel discussion focused on communications with FDA.

Non-Clinical Assessment Model (NAM) Tools Benefit Photonic Device R&D Innovation and FDA Review Processes, Ronald Schuchard, U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Utilizing accurate, efficient, and reliable tools can be challenging, especially given the diversity of photonics technology. A qualified Non-Clinical Assessment Model (NAM) is a non-clinical test model or method that measures or predicts device function. A NAM could be an in vitro (“bench”) model, an ex vivo model or computational model used to measure or predict a device feature or function of interest. Examples of NAM include: in vitro models to replace animal testing, material phantoms to evaluate imaging or other devices and physics-, chemical- or biological- based computational models. Qualified NAMs may be used to evaluate a new material property, modifications to an existing design, or a device feature historically evaluated through other bench, animal or human testing. The qualified NAM, as part of the FDA/CDRH MDDT (Medical Device Development Tool) program, promotes innovation by supporting high quality product R&D and speeds the rate at which safe and effective medical photonic technologies are made accessible to patients.

Medical Device Regulatory Science at the FDA: What We Do and How You Can Contribute,Zane Arp, Srikanth Vasudevan, U.S. Food and Drug Administration

The Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration protects and promotes public health by assuring patients and providers have timely access to safe, effective, and high-quality medical devices and radiation emitting products. As part of CDRH, the Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories (OSEL) conducts regulatory science to provide our customers with the best methods, tools and expertise to ensure readiness for emerging and innovative medical technologies, develop appropriate evaluation strategies and testing standards, create accessible and understandable public health information, and deliver timely and accurate decisions for products across their life cycle. The Division of Biomedical Physics (DBP) within OSEL is responsible for identifying and investigating the biophysical interactions between medical devices and the human body. During this interactive session, Dr. Arp and Dr. Vasudevan will discuss the ongoing efforts for protecting and promoting public health through regulatory science, communicate activities to support medical device innovation, and highlight available platforms to promote collaborative problem solving.

Overcoming Obstacles for FDA 510(k) Clearance as a Small Business
Rahul Singh, Farus, LLC

In today’s small business environment, there are unique challenges in obtaining Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance, and then introducing the cleared device to the market. For a small business, it is important to understand and determine the best approach to reduce risk for a device, and to produce a plan for obtaining FDA 510(k) clearance. In recounting this start-up experience the unique issues for a small business will be explored in this talk, as well as some lessons learned. Further, once with clearance, going to the next step of successfully introducing a device to the market will be explored as well.
BiOS Interactive Poster Session (Monday)
Date: Monday 4 February 2019
Time: 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Conference attendees are invited to attend the BiOS poster session on Monday evening. Come view the posters, enjoy light refreshments, ask questions, and network with colleagues in your field. Authors of poster papers will be present to answer questions concerning their papers. Attendees are required to wear their conference registration badges to the poster sessions. Poster authors, view poster presentation guidelines and set-up instructions at http://spie.org/PWPosterGuidelines.
LASE Interactive Poster Session
Date: Tuesday 5 February 2019
Time: 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Conference attendees are invited to attend the LASE poster session on Tuesday evening. Come view the posters, enjoy light refreshments, ask questions, and network with colleagues in your field. Authors of poster papers will be present to answer questions concerning their papers. Attendees are required to wear their conference registration badges to the poster sessions. Poster authors, view poster presentation guidelines and set-up instructions at http://spie.org/PWPosterGuidelines
Holography
Date: Tuesday 5 February 2019
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Session Chairs: Hans I. Bjelkhagen, Glyndŵr Univ. (United Kingdom) and Hansholo Consulting Ltd. (United Kingdom); V. Michael Bove, MIT Media Lab. (United States)

The Holography Technical Group is involved with the whole record of research, engineering, recording materials, and applications of holography. The main fields of interest are display holograms, commercial and artistic, holographic optical elements (HOEs), holographic interferometry and holographic non-destructive testing (HNDT), computer-generated holography (CGH), electro and digital holography, holographic microscopy, and holographic data storage (HDS).

This meeting will focus on recent developments and directions, in particular, in regard to new materials, color display holography, digital holography, CGHs and HOEs.
Laser Communications
Date: Tuesday 5 February 2019
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Chairs: Hamid Hemmati, Facebook Inc. (United States) and Don Boroson, MIT Lincoln Lab. (United States)

This technical event on Laser Communications will hold its informal annual meeting in conjunction with the Free-Space Laser Communication and Atmospheric Propagation conference. All professionals involved in theory and applications of free-space laser communications, remote sensing and supporting technologies are invited to participate in an open discussion on a variety of topics related to the challenges and advancement of the field. Attendees are invited to bring suggestions for discussion topics.
Early Career Innovation Awards in Quantum Sensing and Nano Electronics and Photonics
Date: Tuesday 5 February 2019
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Session Chair: Manijeh Razeghi, Northwestern Univ. (United States)

SPIE announces the Innovation Award in Quantum Sensing and Nano Electronics and Photonics at SPIE Photonics West OPTO 2019. These awards are open to students and early career professionals of OPTO conference 10926, and will recognize the outstanding scientific contribution of young investigators who present the most notable recent discoveries with broad impact in the areas of quantum sensing and nano electronics and photonics. These discoveries should be innovative in that they represent a new paradigm or way of thinking which will have a broad impact in their respective field. Participants will be required to give a 10-minute review presentation in this Tuesday evening session chaired by Prof. Manijeh Razeghi. The winner(s) will be announced at the end of the session. Winner(s) will be awarded a commemorative plaque as well as a cash prize.

To apply for participation in this session, send your official SPIE Paper Number, your presentation title, and a two-page technical abstract to Prof. Manijeh Razeghi by 14 December 2018.
The Nature of Light: What Are Photons?
Date: Tuesday 5 February 2019
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Session Chair: Narasimha S. Prasad, NASA Langley Research Ctr. (USA)
Speaker: Chandrasekhar Roychoudhuri, Univ. of Connecticut (USA)

The purpose of this workshop is to introduce a model for a “Hybrid Photon” that bridges the conceptual gap between the classical EM wave propagation and quantum mechanical light detection by atoms and molecules. For over two hundred years, we have been propagating Maxwell’s classical EM waves in all branches of optical science and engineering with continuing great successes. We never propagate “indivisible light quanta”, as there is no appropriate guiding equation. We have been doing this since Huygens-Fresnel diffraction integral was formulated by Fresnel in 1817 using Huygens Principle of non-interacting secondary spherical wavelets emanating out of every single points of all wavefronts. However, all optical detectors are quantum mechanical, requiring quantum transition between quantum bands, or quantum levels, or breaking quantum bonds between atoms and molecules. Sustained successes in optical engineering clearly indicate that semi-classical approach to light-matter interaction is the best causal approach. Then why do we keep on saying that we can generate, manipulate, propagate and detect single photons?

The hybrid-photon seamlessly connects the demands of the QM theory and the classical instrumental observations. We just need to recognize the following natural properties of waves and light-matter interactions. (i) Non-Interaction of Waves, or NIW, pronounced by Huygens. (ii) We never “see” light; we just measure the physical outcome of quantum transitions after light absorption. (iii) Respect towards working causal equations – superposition of two beams contains summation of two amplitude parameters and the associated two phase maters. They are real and physical and cannot be carried, while evolving, by a single “indivisible photon”. (iv) The “quantum-cup” of any quantum entity can be filled up by accepting the right quantity of energy out of kinetic (thermal) particles or classical EM waves, besides quantum-quantum transitions. We will also summarize the practical impacts of NIW on a few major optical phenomena.
OPTO Interactive Poster Session
Date: Wednesday 6 February 2019
Time: 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Conference attendees are invited to attend the OPTO poster session on Wednesday evening. Come view the posters, enjoy light refreshments, ask questions, and network with colleagues in your field. Authors of poster papers will be present to answer questions concerning their papers. Attendees are required to wear their conference registration badges to the poster sessions. Poster authors, view poster presentation guidelines and set-up instructions at http://spie.org/PWPosterGuidelines.
NIH Special Session: Funding Opportunities
Date: Sunday 3 February 2019
Time: 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM
1:20 to 1:50 pm
Scientific programs and funding opportunities at the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI)

Speakers: Behrouz Shabestari, Acting Director, Division of Health Informatics Technologies, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, NIH Robert J. Nordstrom, Branch Chief, Image Guided Interventions, Cancer Imaging Program, National Cancer Institute, NIH

The NIBIB mission is to improve health by leading the development and accelerating the application of biomedical technologies. The Institute is committed to integrating the physical and engineering sciences with the life sciences to advance basic research and medical care. The NCI coordinates the National Cancer Program, which conducts and supports research, training, health information dissemination, and other programs with respect to the cause, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of cancer, rehabilitation from cancer, and the continuing care of cancer patients and the families of cancer patients. This presentation will provide an overview of the scientific programs and funding opportunities supported by NIBIB and NCI, highlighting those that are of particular importance to the field of optical imaging and spectroscopy.

1:50 to 2:20 pm
Preparing successful and competitive NIH grant applications

Speaker: Behrouz Shabestari, Acting Director, Division of Health Informatics Technologies, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, NIH

The goal of this presentation is to provide junior faculty and researchers an introduction to preparing and writing a grant proposal for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), specifically related to the field of biomedical imaging and bioengineering. Topics covered include elements of a good grant proposal, NIH funding mechanisms, understanding the NIH format and review criteria, writing tips for compelling applications, and the Dos and Don’ts of successful grant-writing. The NIBIB Trailblazer Award for New and Early Stage Investigators and the new R21 Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant will be discussed.

2:20 to 2:20
Final Questions and Discussion
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