The Moscone Center
San Francisco, California, United States
27 January - 1 February 2018
Professional Development Events
Charting a Course in the Photonics Industry
Date: Sunday 28 January 2018
Time: 2:30 PM - 4:00 PM
Location: Room 2002 (West Level 2)
Shape yourself for a future in photonics

This panel discussion will help you explore potential career pathways in the world of photonics. Get solid advice on how you can translate your knowledge, abilities, and interests into meaningful work. Whether you end up in academia, industry, or start your own company, getting a clear picture of the options from experienced leaders will help you better manage your career trajectory.

Moderator

Andrea Armani
Univ. of Southern California, USA

Andrea Armani received her BA in physics from the Univ. of Chicago and her PhD in applied physics from the California Institute of Technology where she continued as the Clare Boothe Luce post-doctoral Fellow in biology and chemical engineering. She is currently a Professor of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science and Electrical Engineering-Electrophysics in the Viterbi School of Engineering at the University of Southern California.

Panelists

Kate Bechtel, Triple Ring Technologies Inc., Andreas Frölich, Nanoscribe, Ryan Shelton, PhotoniCare, Inc., Cather Simpson, Univ. of Auckland
Essential Skills for a Career in Industry
Date: Monday 29 January 2018
Time: 1:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Location: InterContinental Hotel 5th Floor, Howard
WS1240

Course Level: Introductory
Course Length: Half-day (3.5 hours)
Continuing Education Units (CEU): 0.35 Available upon request.

Working in industry is very different than academia. An advanced degree in science and engineering gives you many technical skills that are valuable in the private sector, but there are a lot of important aspects of working in a company that aren’t taught in school. This course gives you the industry primer you need.

The course will start with an overview of the five most important ways that working in industry is different than the academic research environment STEM graduate students are trained in. Next, we will cover five habits that scientists and engineers who are successful in industry learn quickly. We will also cover some basics of company finance, how projects are managed in industry, and some tricks for keeping your projects on schedule.

Learning Outcomes
After completing this course, attendees will be able to
• describe five ways that technical work in industry is different than academic research
• list the five habits that scientists and engineers who are successful in industry learn quickly
• explain a corporate financial statement and point out where engineering/R&D fits into the profit model
• describe why making decisions quickly is so important in industry, and explain a new technique for making a decision when the 'right' answer is not clear
• list the key elements of a typical industry development project, and describe tactics for keeping it on schedule


Intended Audience
This course is intended for graduate students in science and engineering programs who are looking to pursue careers in industry. Scientists and engineers who are already working in industry and want to accelerate their career progress will also find this course very helpful.

Instructors
David M. Giltner is the author of the book Turning Science into Things People Need, and is an internationally recognized speaker and mentor for early career scientists and engineers seeking careers in industry. He has spent the last 20 years commercializing photonics technologies in a variety of roles for several companies including JDS Uniphase and Ball Aerospace. Through his time in the private sector, David learned how to function well in both highly technical and business circles, and has often functioned as an interpreter to help these two words communicate more productively. David has a BS and PhD in physics and holds six patents in the fields of laser spectroscopy and optical communications.

Note: This course is free to technical attendees. No advance registration required.
Resumes to Interviews: Strategies for a Successful Job Search
Date: Monday 29 January 2018
Time: 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Location: Marriott Marquis Hotel, Sierra J
WS1059

Course Level: Introductory
Course Length: Two hours
Continuing Education Units (CEU): 0.35 Available upon request.

This course reviews effective strategies and techniques for a successful job search such as: compiling resumes, writing cover letters, and interviewing tips. The primary goal of the course is to provide creative and proven techniques for new college graduates and professionals to plan and conduct their job search and secure a job. Creative and comprehensive job search techniques will be discussed as well as actual resume and interviewing examples and tips. Anyone who is getting ready to enter the work force who wants to answer questions such as, "when and how do I start my job search?," "what kind of cover letter and resume gets noticed?" or "how do I sell myself in an interview?" will benefit from taking this course.

Learning Outcomes
This course will enable you to:
• start and create your job search plan
• create an online networking presence
• build and write effective cover letters and resumes that get noticed
• avoid common resume and cover letter mistakes
• interview with confidence

Intended Audience
Graduate students, new graduates, and early-career professionals who wish to learn more about creating a job search plan, writing an effective cover letter and resume that gets you noticed, and techniques for successful interviews.

Instructor

Heather Welch has been in human resources and corporate recruiting for more than 20 years. She has extensive experience with both in-house corporate environments as well as outside agency environments. Heather is currently the Sr. Recruiter for Daylight Solutions in San Diego, and also a member of SHRM, IEEE, and SWE.

Note: This course is free to technical attendees. No advance registration required. This workshop presents introductory information and is intended primarily for university students and others with little professional experience.
The Craft of Scientific Presentations: A Workshop on Technical Presentations
Date: Tuesday 30 January 2018
Time: 8:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Location: Marriott Marquis Hotel, Sierra K
WS667

Course Level: Introductory
Course Length: Half-day (3.5 hours)
Continuing Education Units (CEU): 0.35 Available upon request.

This course provides attendees with an overview of what distinguishes the best scientific presentations. The course introduces a new design for presentation slides that is both more memorable and persuasive from what is typically shown at conferences.

Learning Outcomes
After completing this course, attendees will be able to
• account for the audience, purpose, and occasion in a presentation
• logically structure the introduction, middle, and ending of a scientific presentation
• create a memorable and persuasive set of presentation slides
• deliver a presentation with more confidence

Intended Audience
This material is intended for anyone who needs to present scientific research. Those who either have not yet presented or have made several presentations will find this course valuable.

Instructors
Christine Haas brings over ten years of experience working at the intersection of communication and science. She's held positions as the director of marketing for Drexel’s College of Engineering and director of operations for the dean of engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Now, as principal of Christine Haas Consulting, LLC and director of the Engineering Ambassadors Network, she continues to work with scientists and engineers across industry, government, and higher education to deliver training on presentations and technical writing. Christine received her MBA in marketing from Drexel University and her BA in English from Dickinson College.

Note: This course is free to technical attendees. No advance registration required.
The Craft of Scientific Writing: A Workshop on Technical Writing
Date: Tuesday 30 January 2018
Time: 1:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Location: Marriott Marquis Hotel, Sierra K
WS668

Course Level: Introductory
Course Length: Half-day (3.5 hours)
Continuing Education Units (CEU): 0.35 Available upon request.

This course provides an overview on writing a scientific paper. The course focuses on the structure, language, and illustration of scientific papers.

Learning Outcomes
This course will enable you to:
• account for the audience, purpose, and occasion in a scientific paper
• logically structure the introduction, middle, and ending of a scientific paper
• make your language clear, energetic, and fluid
• avoid the most common mechanical errors in scientific writing

Intended Audience
This material is intended for anyone who needs to write about scientific research. Those who either have not yet written a paper or have written several papers will find this course valuable.

Instructors
Christine Haas brings over ten years of experience working at the intersection of communication and science. She's held positions as the director of marketing for Drexel’s College of Engineering and director of operations for the dean of engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Now, as principal of Christine Haas Consulting, LLC and director of the Engineering Ambassadors Network, she continues to work with scientists and engineers across industry, government, and higher education to deliver training on presentations and technical writing. Christine received her MBA in marketing from Drexel University and her BA in English from Dickinson College.

Note: This course is free to technical attendees. No advance registration required.
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