The Moscone Center
San Francisco, California, United States
2 - 7 February 2019
Professional Development Events
Developing Systems for Optimal Productivity
Date: Sunday 3 February 2019
Time: 8:30 AM - 12:30 PM
WS1261

Course Level: Introductory
Course Length: 3.5 hours
Continuing Education Units (CEU): 0.4 Available upon request.

Open to those with a paid registration badge.
No advance registration required.


By understanding the principles of systems thinking, students will learn to identify both the helpful and harmful habits and routines of their lives to make small, incremental changes to improve personal productivity. Such changes have the power to reduce stress and improve overall satisfaction. Students in this workshop will learn how to create a customized system that will increase their productivity by establishing goals, decreasing errors, auditing for optimization, and tracking their progress. This workshop will also encourage students to lean into failure, improve motivation, and maintain or improve current systems with the least amount of effort. Students will walk away from the workshop with a plan to implement immediately as well as a duplicable process, templates, and guidelines for future systems building projects

Learning Outcomes
This course will enable you to:
• identify the Nine Rules of Productivity and define which ones will be most fruitful to prioritize.
• design a simple, personalized system to help reach a professional or personal goal using the Steps of Construction.
• demonstrate how to diagnose and fix failure points with system audits using the Steps of Optimization.

Intended Audience
This workshop is intended for students and early career professionals who are interested in developing productivity systems to help them achieve their goals and optimize results in the classroom, lab, or workplace.

Instructor


Tyler Tevooren is the founder of Riskology, a leadership training company for introverts. Riskology's courses have educated thousands of leaders at small businesses and Fortune 500 companies alike, and Tyler's blog is read by over a million people each year.
Women Communicating with Confidence
Date: Sunday 3 February 2019
Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Open to those with a paid registration badge.
No advance registration required.


Join us for a session on how to command attention and get your point across in a variety of professional settings from networking at events to your next business meeting.

Learning Outcomes
This course will enable you to:
  • utilize frameworks that yield clear and concise communication in a variety of situations
  • adjust your delivery style to boost credibility and confidence
  • reduce nervousness associated with public speaking
Instructor

Christine Haas brings over ten years of experience working at the intersection of communication and science. She's held positions as the director of marketing for Drexel’s College of Engineering and director of operations for the dean of engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Now, as principal of Christine Haas Consulting, LLC and director of the Engineering Ambassadors Network, she continues to work with scientists and engineers across industry, government, and higher education to deliver training on presentations and technical writing. Christine received her MBA in marketing from Drexel University and her BA in English from Dickinson College.
Think Like an Entrepreneur
Date: Sunday 3 February 2019
Time: 10:30 AM - 5:00 PM
WS1250

Course Level: Introductory

Registration required

Have you ever wondered if something you’ve developed in the lab could be the basis for a business?

This full-day workshop and networking event brings experienced photonics entrepreneurs and specialists together with people who need to demystify the process of starting their own venture using light-based technologies.

Experienced entrepreneurs and trainers will introduce foundational concepts of entrepreneurship to optics & photonics researchers so that they understand the different mindsets and networks they may need to be successful with a business venture. These mindsets are important whether you are building a business from nothing or trying to introduce a new product in an existing company. Explore the diverse skills and demands needed to do modern product development.

  • Think like a Founder – Starting something from nothing
  • Think like a Customer – What will solve their real problems
  • Think like a CEO – Building a team
  • Think like a VC – Financing teams, getting a payoff
  • Think like a Manufacturer – Prototyping, building lean, selling it quickly

  • A networking lunch is provided with the workshop purchase. Registration can be purchased through the course link: http://spie.org/PW/course/think-like-an-entrepreneur.

    Instructor: Farzin Samadani has a diverse background in business and technology. As co-founder of Curious Me, LLC, he provides business modeling and advisory services for early stage startups. Farzin is also a member of the national teaching faculty of the National Science Foundation Innovation Corps (NSF I-Corps) program and part of the teaching team of Innovation Node-Los Angeles, serving as instructor for various entrepreneurship programs such as Hacking 4 Defense. Farzin’s education is in Business Management and Accounting from the University of Maryland.


    Charting a Course in the Photonics Industry
    Date: Sunday 3 February 2019
    Time: 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
    Open to those with a paid registration badge.
    No advance registration required.


    Shape yourself for a future in photonics

    This panel discussion will help you explore potential career pathways in the world of photonics. Get solid advice on how you can translate your knowledge, abilities, and interests into meaningful work. Whether you end up in academia, industry, or start your own company, getting a clear picture of the options from experienced leaders will help you better manage your career trajectory.
    Grant Writing from the Ground Up
    Date: Monday 4 February 2019
    Time: 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
    WS1058

    Course Level: Introductory
    Course Length: Half-day (3.5 hours)
    Continuing Education Units (CEU): 0.35 Available upon request

    Open to those with a paid registration badge.
    No advance registration required.


    All research requires funding. That truth means that proposal writing is an essential skill for all scientists and engineers, whether in academia or industry. Unfortunately, most early career professionals are uncomfortable “selling” their research. This workshop addresses “grant phobia” by teaching attendees how to align research with funding opportunities, develop firm project plans, and communicate effectively to reviewers. Attendees leave the course with the skill to build quality proposals that are compelling and convincing.

    Instructor: Damon Diehl is a professional writer specializing in scientific content. He has a doctorate in optics from the University of Rochester and a bachelor’s degree in physics from the University of Chicago. His grant-writing course is based on two decades of academic and industrial research experience. Over 90% of the scientific grants he has written have been funded, and every client that he has worked with has won funding within two tries.
    Women's Salary Negotiation Workshop
    Date: Monday 4 February 2019
    Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
    Open to those with a paid registration badge.
    No advance registration required.


    SPIE is hosting an AAUW Work Smart Workshop to help participants gain confidence in their negotiation style through facilitated discussion and role-play. Gain useful negotiation skills for a new job, raise, or promotion.

    Participants will learn:
    • how to identify and articulate their personal value
    • how to develop an arsenal of persuasive responses and other strategies to use when negotiating
    • how to conduct objective market research to benchmark a target salary and benefits
    • about the pay gap, including its long-term consequences on their careers
    Resumes to Interviews: Strategies for a Successful Job Search
    Date: Monday 4 February 2019
    Time: 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
    WS1059

    Course Level: Introductory
    Continuing Education Units (CEU): 0.2 Available upon request

    Open to those with a paid registration badge.
    No advance registration required.


    This course reviews effective strategies and techniques for a successful job search such as: compiling resumes, writing cover letters, and interviewing tips. The primary goal of the course is to provide creative and proven techniques for new college graduates and professionals to plan and conduct their job search and secure a job. Creative and comprehensive job search techniques will be discussed as well as actual resume and interviewing examples and tips. Anyone who is getting ready to enter the work force who wants to answer questions such as, "when and how do I start my job search?," "what kind of cover letter and resume gets noticed?" or "how do I sell myself in an interview?" will benefit from taking this course.

    Learning Outcomes
    This course will enable you to:
    • start and create your job search plan
    • create an online networking presence
    • build and write effective cover letters and resumes that get noticed
    • avoid common resume and cover letter mistakes
    • interview with confidence

    Intended Audience
    Graduate students, new graduates, and early-career professionals who wish to learn more about creating a job search plan, writing an effective cover letter and resume that gets you noticed, and techniques for successful interviews.

    Instructor
    Heather Welch has been in human resources and corporate recruiting for more than 20 years. She has extensive experience with both in-house corporate environments as well as outside agency environments. Heather is currently the Sr. Recruiter for DRS Daylight Solutions in San Diego, and also a member of SHRM, IEEE, and SWE.
    Essential Skills for a Career in Industry
    Date: Tuesday 5 February 2019
    Time: 8:30 AM - 12:30 PM
    WS1240

    Course Level: Introductory
    Course Length: Half-day (3.5 hours)
    Continuing Education Units (CEU): 0.35 Available upon request

    Open to those with a paid registration badge.
    No advance registration required.


    Working in industry is very different than academia. An advanced degree in science and engineering gives you many technical skills that are valuable in the private sector, but there are a lot of important aspects of working in a company that aren’t taught in school. This course gives you the industry primer you need.

    The course will start with an overview of the five most important ways that working in industry is different than the academic research environment STEM graduate students are trained in. Next, we will cover five habits that scientists and engineers who are successful in industry learn quickly. We will also cover some basics of company finance, how projects are managed in industry, and some tricks for keeping your projects on schedule.

    Learning Outcomes
    After completing this course, attendees will be able to:
    • describe five ways that technical work in industry is different than academic research
    • list the five habits that scientists and engineers who are successful in industry learn quickly
    • explain a corporate financial statement and point out where engineering/R&D fits into the profit model
    • describe why making decisions quickly is so important in industry, and explain a new technique for making a decision when the 'right' answer is not clear
    • list the key elements of a typical industry development project, and describe tactics for keeping it on schedule

    Intended Audience
    This course is intended for graduate students in science and engineering programs who are looking to pursue careers in industry. Scientists and engineers who are already working in industry and want to accelerate their career progress will also find this course very helpful.

    Instructor

    David M. Giltner is the author of the book Turning Science into Things People Need, and is an internationally recognized speaker and mentor for early career scientists and engineers seeking careers in industry. He has spent the last 20 years commercializing photonics technologies in a variety of roles for several companies including JDS Uniphase and Ball Aerospace. Through his time in the private sector, David learned how to function well in both highly technical and business circles, and has often functioned as an interpreter to help these two words communicate more productively. David has a BS and PhD in physics and holds six patents in the fields of laser spectroscopy and optical communications.
    The Craft of Scientific Presentations: A Workshop on Technical Presentations
    Date: Tuesday 5 February 2019
    Time: 8:30 AM - 12:30 PM
    WS667

    Course Level: Introductory
    Course Length: Half-day (3.5 hours)
    Continuing Education Units (CEU): 0.35 Available upon request

    Open to those with a paid registration badge.
    No advance registration required.


    This course provides attendees with an overview of what distinguishes the best scientific presentations. The course introduces a new design for presentation slides that is both more memorable and persuasive from what is typically shown at conferences.

    Learning Outcomes
    After completing this course, attendees will be able to:
    • account for the audience, purpose, and occasion in a presentation
    • logically structure the introduction, middle, and ending of a scientific presentation
    • create a memorable and persuasive set of presentation slides
    • deliver a presentation with more confidence

    Intended Audience
    This material is intended for anyone who needs to present scientific research. Those who either have not yet presented or have made several presentations will find this course valuable.

    Instructor

    Christine Haas brings over ten years of experience working at the intersection of communication and science. She's held positions as the director of marketing for Drexel’s College of Engineering and director of operations for the dean of engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Now, as principal of Christine Haas Consulting, LLC and director of the Engineering Ambassadors Network, she continues to work with scientists and engineers across industry, government, and higher education to deliver training on presentations and technical writing. Christine received her MBA in marketing from Drexel University and her BA in English from Dickinson College.
    The Craft of Scientific Writing: A Workshop on Technical Writing
    Date: Tuesday 5 February 2019
    Time: 1:30 PM - 5:30 PM
    WS668

    Course Level: Introductory
    Course Length: Half-day (3.5 hours)
    Continuing Education Units (CEU): 0.35 Available upon request

    Open to those with a paid registration badge.
    No advance registration required.


    This course provides an overview on writing a scientific paper. The course focuses on the structure, language, and illustration of scientific papers.

    Learning Outcomes
    This course will enable you to:
    • account for the audience, purpose, and occasion in a scientific paper
    • logically structure the introduction, middle, and ending of a scientific paper
    • make your language clear, energetic, and fluid
    • avoid the most common mechanical errors in scientific writing

    Intended Audience
    This material is intended for anyone who needs to write about scientific research. Those who either have not yet written a paper or have written several papers will find this course valuable.

    Instructor

    Kathryn Kirsch is a mechanical engineer who has been active in teaching effective scientific communication strategies for the past nine years. She has co-taught courses on the assertion-evidence slide design and technical writing in both academic and industrial settings. She also volunteers as a speaker consultant for the regional TED conference held each year at Penn State. Outside of her communications workshops, Katie works as an optimization engineer at KCF Technologies, Inc. in State College, PA. She received her B.S. (’11), M.S. (’13), and Ph.D. (’17) degrees at Penn State.
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